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Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Neonates Delivered at Term-gestation by Elective Cesarean Section at Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman.
Oman Med J. 2020 May; 2020(35):e133.OM

Abstract

Objectives

We sought to assess the relationship between respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in neonates delivered by elective cesarean section at term gestation with and without corticosteroids cover. We also aimed to determine other neonatal complications such as sepsis, hypoglycemia, and hyperbilirubinemia.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective descriptive study from January 2010 to December 2015 on all Omani women who delivered by elective cesarean section at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 37+0 and 38+6 weeks gestation.

Results

Among 650 patients included in the study, 20.8% (n = 135) received corticosteroids antenatally and 79.2% did not. RDS was found in 16 out of 650 neonates, making the prevalence of RDS 2.5%. Higher gravidity and parity and a mean gestational age of less than 37.6 weeks, were associated with a significant risk of RDS. Administration of antenatal corticosteroids did not change the respiratory morbidity in the newborns (p = 0.340). A mean birth weight of 2.9 kg was associated with a significant risk of RDS (p = 0.043). All 16 newborns required neonatal intensive care unit admission and ventilator support. The most common ventilatory support used was continuous positive airway pressure (56.2%). The most common secondary complication in neonates diagnosed with RDS was transient tachypnea of the newborn (53.8%).

Conclusions

The prevalence of RDS was low. Giving antenatal corticosteroids for patients with planned elective cesarean at term did not seem to have a beneficial effect on neonatal respiratory morbidity. Further studies with larger sample size including multiple centers is recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman.Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Training Program, Oman Medical Specialty Board, Muscat, Oman.Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Training Program, Oman Medical Specialty Board, Muscat, Oman.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman.Department of Child Health, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman.Epidemiology and Biostatistics Section, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32607253

Citation

Al Riyami, Nihal, et al. "Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Neonates Delivered at Term-gestation By Elective Cesarean Section at Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman." Oman Medical Journal, vol. 2020, no. 35, 2020, pp. e133.
Al Riyami N, Al Hadhrami A, Al Lawati T, et al. Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Neonates Delivered at Term-gestation by Elective Cesarean Section at Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman. Oman Med J. 2020;2020(35):e133.
Al Riyami, N., Al Hadhrami, A., Al Lawati, T., Pillai, S., Abdellatif, M., & Jaju, S. (2020). Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Neonates Delivered at Term-gestation by Elective Cesarean Section at Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman. Oman Medical Journal, 2020(35), e133. https://doi.org/10.5001/omj.2020.51
Al Riyami N, et al. Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Neonates Delivered at Term-gestation By Elective Cesarean Section at Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman. Oman Med J. 2020;2020(35):e133. PubMed PMID: 32607253.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Neonates Delivered at Term-gestation by Elective Cesarean Section at Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman. AU - Al Riyami,Nihal, AU - Al Hadhrami,Abeer, AU - Al Lawati,Tuqa, AU - Pillai,Silja, AU - Abdellatif,Mohamed, AU - Jaju,Sanjay, Y1 - 2020/06/25/ PY - 2019/06/01/received PY - 2020/05/13/accepted PY - 2020/7/2/entrez PY - 2020/7/2/pubmed PY - 2020/7/2/medline KW - Cesarean Section KW - Infant, Newborn KW - Oman KW - Pregnancy KW - Pregnancy Outcome KW - Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn SP - e133 EP - e133 JF - Oman medical journal JO - Oman Med J VL - 2020 IS - 35 N2 - Objectives: We sought to assess the relationship between respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in neonates delivered by elective cesarean section at term gestation with and without corticosteroids cover. We also aimed to determine other neonatal complications such as sepsis, hypoglycemia, and hyperbilirubinemia. Methods: We conducted a retrospective descriptive study from January 2010 to December 2015 on all Omani women who delivered by elective cesarean section at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 37+0 and 38+6 weeks gestation. Results: Among 650 patients included in the study, 20.8% (n = 135) received corticosteroids antenatally and 79.2% did not. RDS was found in 16 out of 650 neonates, making the prevalence of RDS 2.5%. Higher gravidity and parity and a mean gestational age of less than 37.6 weeks, were associated with a significant risk of RDS. Administration of antenatal corticosteroids did not change the respiratory morbidity in the newborns (p = 0.340). A mean birth weight of 2.9 kg was associated with a significant risk of RDS (p = 0.043). All 16 newborns required neonatal intensive care unit admission and ventilator support. The most common ventilatory support used was continuous positive airway pressure (56.2%). The most common secondary complication in neonates diagnosed with RDS was transient tachypnea of the newborn (53.8%). Conclusions: The prevalence of RDS was low. Giving antenatal corticosteroids for patients with planned elective cesarean at term did not seem to have a beneficial effect on neonatal respiratory morbidity. Further studies with larger sample size including multiple centers is recommended. SN - 1999-768X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32607253/Respiratory_Distress_Syndrome_in_Neonates_Delivered_at_Term-gestation_by_Elective_Cesarean_Section_at_Tertiary_Care_Hospital_in_Oman L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/32607253/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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