Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Red blood cell distribution width and peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis prognosis.
Ren Fail. 2020 Nov; 42(1):613-621.RF

Abstract

Objective:

Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a parameter of the heterogeneity of circulating erythrocyte size. Recent researches have pointed out a link among RDW, chronic kidney disease, and inflammation. We sought to investigate the prognostic value of baseline RDW in patients with peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis (PDAP).

Methods:

Our study included 337 peritonitis episodes experienced by 202 patients who were undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) at a single center from 2013 to 2018. Episodes were categorized according to the tertiles of baseline RDW levels (T1, <13.2%; T2, 13.2-14.3%; T3, >14.3%). Routine logistic regression and generalized estimating equation (GEE) were used to estimate the association between RDW and treatment failure, which was defined as relapse/recurrent episodes, catheter removal, or death during therapy.

Results:

After adjusting for other potential predictors, RDW exhibited an incremental relationship with the risk of treatment failure. The baseline RDW of T3 indicated a 43% and 52% increased venture of treatment failure in logistic and GEE analyses, respectively, compared with T1. As a continuous variable, the fitting curve based on restricted cubic spiline showed that the relationship was nonlinearly but positively correlated. The multivariate model A (combined RDW with baseline age, albumin, serum ferritin, and duration on CAPD) showed an area under the curve of 0.671 (95% confidence interval, 0.5920.749) for the prediction of treatment failure.

Conclusions:

A Higher baseline level of RDW was significantly associated with a greater rate of treatment failure among PDAP episodes independent of other potential predictors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nephrology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.Department of Nephrology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.Department of Nephrology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China. Department of Nephrology, Shaanxi Provincial Secondary People's Hospital, Xi'an, China.Department of Nephrology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.Department of Nephrology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.Department of Nephrology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.Department of Nephrology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32611209

Citation

He, Peng, et al. "Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Peritoneal Dialysis-associated Peritonitis Prognosis." Renal Failure, vol. 42, no. 1, 2020, pp. 613-621.
He P, Hu JP, Li H, et al. Red blood cell distribution width and peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis prognosis. Ren Fail. 2020;42(1):613-621.
He, P., Hu, J. P., Li, H., Tian, X. J., He, L. J., Sun, S. R., & Huang, C. (2020). Red blood cell distribution width and peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis prognosis. Renal Failure, 42(1), 613-621. https://doi.org/10.1080/0886022X.2020.1786401
He P, et al. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Peritoneal Dialysis-associated Peritonitis Prognosis. Ren Fail. 2020;42(1):613-621. PubMed PMID: 32611209.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Red blood cell distribution width and peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis prognosis. AU - He,Peng, AU - Hu,Jin-Ping, AU - Li,Huan, AU - Tian,Xiu-Juan, AU - He,Li-Jie, AU - Sun,Shi-Ren, AU - Huang,Chen, PY - 2020/7/3/entrez KW - Red blood cell distribution width KW - chronic kidney disease KW - peritoneal dialysis KW - peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis SP - 613 EP - 621 JF - Renal failure JO - Ren Fail VL - 42 IS - 1 N2 - Objective: Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a parameter of the heterogeneity of circulating erythrocyte size. Recent researches have pointed out a link among RDW, chronic kidney disease, and inflammation. We sought to investigate the prognostic value of baseline RDW in patients with peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis (PDAP).Methods: Our study included 337 peritonitis episodes experienced by 202 patients who were undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) at a single center from 2013 to 2018. Episodes were categorized according to the tertiles of baseline RDW levels (T1, <13.2%; T2, 13.2-14.3%; T3, >14.3%). Routine logistic regression and generalized estimating equation (GEE) were used to estimate the association between RDW and treatment failure, which was defined as relapse/recurrent episodes, catheter removal, or death during therapy.Results: After adjusting for other potential predictors, RDW exhibited an incremental relationship with the risk of treatment failure. The baseline RDW of T3 indicated a 43% and 52% increased venture of treatment failure in logistic and GEE analyses, respectively, compared with T1. As a continuous variable, the fitting curve based on restricted cubic spiline showed that the relationship was nonlinearly but positively correlated. The multivariate model A (combined RDW with baseline age, albumin, serum ferritin, and duration on CAPD) showed an area under the curve of 0.671 (95% confidence interval, 0.5920.749) for the prediction of treatment failure.Conclusions: A Higher baseline level of RDW was significantly associated with a greater rate of treatment failure among PDAP episodes independent of other potential predictors. SN - 1525-6049 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32611209/Red_blood_cell_distribution_width_and_peritoneal_dialysis-associated_peritonitis_prognosis L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0886022X.2020.1786401 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.