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Microcirculation and somatosensory profiling of patients with periodontitis: a preliminary case control report.
Clin Oral Investig. 2020 Jul 02 [Online ahead of print]CO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The purpose of this preliminary study was to explore blood microcirculation and somatosensory profiles in periodontitis patients before and after non-surgical periodontal therapy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Twenty patients (10 men and 10 women, 20 to 30 years old) and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included. Non-surgical periodontal therapy was performed for all patients. Clinical examination including pocket probing depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and bleeding on probing (BOP) were performed at baseline (BL), 1 week (1W), and 4 weeks (4W) after non-surgical periodontal therapy on 6 sites of tooth 32 and 42. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and quantitative sensory testing (QST) were applied at the attached gingiva of tooth 32 and 42 at BL, 1W, and 4W after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Data were analyzed with a two-way mixed-model of ANOVA.

RESULTS

The PPD, CAL and BOP significantly improved after non-surgical periodontal therapy (p < 0.001). Periodontitis patients demonstrated a higher tissue microvascular blood cell concentration (p = 0.015) and a significant gain in thermal (p = 0.037) and mechanical (p = 0.003) somatosensory function compared to controls. After non-surgical periodontal therapy, the flux (p = 0.002) and speed (p = 0.008) of blood flow decreased significantly and thermal (p = 0.029) and mechanical (p < 0.001) somatosensory function were reversed.

CONCLUSION

Gingival microcirculation and somatosensory function seem impaired in patients with periodontitis and are reversed following non-surgical periodontal therapy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

LDF and QST may be appropriate tools to further characterize gingival inflammation and treatment responses in periodontitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Orofacial Pain & TMD Research Unit, Institute of Stomatology, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. Department of Periodontics, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, 136 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing, 210029, People's Republic of China. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.Orofacial Pain & TMD Research Unit, Institute of Stomatology, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. Department of Periodontics, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, 136 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing, 210029, People's Republic of China. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.Department of Periodontics, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, 136 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing, 210029, People's Republic of China. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.Department of Periodontics, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, 136 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing, 210029, People's Republic of China. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.Orofacial Pain & TMD Research Unit, Institute of Stomatology, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. yanxu_group@163.com. Department of Periodontics, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, 136 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing, 210029, People's Republic of China. yanxu_group@163.com. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. yanxu_group@163.com.Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. Faculty of Odontology, Malmø University, Malmø, Sweden. Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences (SCON), Aarhus, Denmark.Orofacial Pain & TMD Research Unit, Institute of Stomatology, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI), Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32613435

Citation

Fan, Ruyi, et al. "Microcirculation and Somatosensory Profiling of Patients With Periodontitis: a Preliminary Case Control Report." Clinical Oral Investigations, 2020.
Fan R, Gou H, Wang X, et al. Microcirculation and somatosensory profiling of patients with periodontitis: a preliminary case control report. Clin Oral Investig. 2020.
Fan, R., Gou, H., Wang, X., Li, L., Xu, Y., Svensson, P., & Wang, K. (2020). Microcirculation and somatosensory profiling of patients with periodontitis: a preliminary case control report. Clinical Oral Investigations. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-020-03427-w
Fan R, et al. Microcirculation and Somatosensory Profiling of Patients With Periodontitis: a Preliminary Case Control Report. Clin Oral Investig. 2020 Jul 2; PubMed PMID: 32613435.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microcirculation and somatosensory profiling of patients with periodontitis: a preliminary case control report. AU - Fan,Ruyi, AU - Gou,Huiqing, AU - Wang,Xiaoqian, AU - Li,Lu, AU - Xu,Yan, AU - Svensson,Peter, AU - Wang,Kelun, Y1 - 2020/07/02/ PY - 2020/04/10/received PY - 2020/06/19/accepted PY - 2020/7/3/entrez KW - Microvascular blood flow KW - Non-surgical periodontal therapy KW - Periodontitis KW - Quantitative sensory testing JF - Clinical oral investigations JO - Clin Oral Investig N2 - OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this preliminary study was to explore blood microcirculation and somatosensory profiles in periodontitis patients before and after non-surgical periodontal therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients (10 men and 10 women, 20 to 30 years old) and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included. Non-surgical periodontal therapy was performed for all patients. Clinical examination including pocket probing depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and bleeding on probing (BOP) were performed at baseline (BL), 1 week (1W), and 4 weeks (4W) after non-surgical periodontal therapy on 6 sites of tooth 32 and 42. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and quantitative sensory testing (QST) were applied at the attached gingiva of tooth 32 and 42 at BL, 1W, and 4W after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Data were analyzed with a two-way mixed-model of ANOVA. RESULTS: The PPD, CAL and BOP significantly improved after non-surgical periodontal therapy (p < 0.001). Periodontitis patients demonstrated a higher tissue microvascular blood cell concentration (p = 0.015) and a significant gain in thermal (p = 0.037) and mechanical (p = 0.003) somatosensory function compared to controls. After non-surgical periodontal therapy, the flux (p = 0.002) and speed (p = 0.008) of blood flow decreased significantly and thermal (p = 0.029) and mechanical (p < 0.001) somatosensory function were reversed. CONCLUSION: Gingival microcirculation and somatosensory function seem impaired in patients with periodontitis and are reversed following non-surgical periodontal therapy. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: LDF and QST may be appropriate tools to further characterize gingival inflammation and treatment responses in periodontitis. SN - 1436-3771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32613435/Microcirculation_and_somatosensory_profiling_of_patients_with_periodontitis:_a_preliminary_case_control_report L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-020-03427-w DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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