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Global Problem of Hospital Detention Practices.
Int J Health Policy Manag. 2020 Aug 01; 9(8):319-326.IJ

Abstract

Although an official definition by the World Health Organization (WHO) or any other authority is currently lacking, hospital detention practices (HDP) can be described as: "refusing release of either living patients after medical discharge is clinically indicated or refusing release of bodies of deceased patients if families are unable to pay their hospital bills." Reports of HDP are very scarce and lack consistent terminology. Consequently, the problem's scale is unknown. This study aimed to find evidence of HDP worldwide, explore characteristics of HDP reports, and compare countries with or without reports. PubMed and Google were examined for relevant English, Spanish, and French publications up to January 2019. Of 195 countries, HDP reports were found in 46 countries (24%) in Africa, Asia, South-America, Europe, and North-America. Most reports were published by journalists in newspapers. In most countries reports concern living adults and children who are imprisoned in public hospitals. A majority (52%) of reports were of individuals detained for at least a month. Almost all countries, with or without HDP reports, have signed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Countries with reported HDP have larger population size (P<.001), worse Corruption Perception Index score (P=.025), higher out-of-pocket expenditure (P=.024), lower Universal Health Coverage Index score (P=.015), and worse Press Freedom Index score (P=.012). We conclude that HDP are more widespread than currently acknowledged. Urgent intervention by stakeholders is required to stop HDP.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.Amsterdam University Medical Center, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Amsterdam University Medical Center, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Department of Oncology, Benjamin Bloom Hospital, San Salvador, El Salvador.Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.Amsterdam University Medical Center, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Amsterdam University Medical Center, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32613805

Citation

Handayani, Krisna, et al. "Global Problem of Hospital Detention Practices." International Journal of Health Policy and Management, vol. 9, no. 8, 2020, pp. 319-326.
Handayani K, Sijbranda TC, Westenberg MA, et al. Global Problem of Hospital Detention Practices. Int J Health Policy Manag. 2020;9(8):319-326.
Handayani, K., Sijbranda, T. C., Westenberg, M. A., Rossell, N., Sitaresmi, M. N., Kaspers, G. J., & Mostert, S. (2020). Global Problem of Hospital Detention Practices. International Journal of Health Policy and Management, 9(8), 319-326. https://doi.org/10.15171/ijhpm.2020.10
Handayani K, et al. Global Problem of Hospital Detention Practices. Int J Health Policy Manag. 2020 Aug 1;9(8):319-326. PubMed PMID: 32613805.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Global Problem of Hospital Detention Practices. AU - Handayani,Krisna, AU - Sijbranda,Tyas C, AU - Westenberg,Maurits A, AU - Rossell,Nuria, AU - Sitaresmi,Mei N, AU - Kaspers,Gertjan Jl, AU - Mostert,Saskia, Y1 - 2020/08/01/ PY - 2019/10/28/received PY - 2020/01/18/accepted PY - 2020/7/3/entrez KW - Corruption KW - Hospital Detention Practices KW - Universal Health Coverage SP - 319 EP - 326 JF - International journal of health policy and management JO - Int J Health Policy Manag VL - 9 IS - 8 N2 - Although an official definition by the World Health Organization (WHO) or any other authority is currently lacking, hospital detention practices (HDP) can be described as: "refusing release of either living patients after medical discharge is clinically indicated or refusing release of bodies of deceased patients if families are unable to pay their hospital bills." Reports of HDP are very scarce and lack consistent terminology. Consequently, the problem's scale is unknown. This study aimed to find evidence of HDP worldwide, explore characteristics of HDP reports, and compare countries with or without reports. PubMed and Google were examined for relevant English, Spanish, and French publications up to January 2019. Of 195 countries, HDP reports were found in 46 countries (24%) in Africa, Asia, South-America, Europe, and North-America. Most reports were published by journalists in newspapers. In most countries reports concern living adults and children who are imprisoned in public hospitals. A majority (52%) of reports were of individuals detained for at least a month. Almost all countries, with or without HDP reports, have signed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Countries with reported HDP have larger population size (P<.001), worse Corruption Perception Index score (P=.025), higher out-of-pocket expenditure (P=.024), lower Universal Health Coverage Index score (P=.015), and worse Press Freedom Index score (P=.012). We conclude that HDP are more widespread than currently acknowledged. Urgent intervention by stakeholders is required to stop HDP. SN - 2322-5939 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32613805/Global_Problem_of_Hospital_Detention_Practices DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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