Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Epidemiological and molecular characterization of a novel adenovirus of squirrel monkeys after fatal infection during immunosuppression.
Microb Genom. 2020 Jul 02 [Online ahead of print]MG

Abstract

Adenoviruses are a frequent cause of acute upper respiratory tract infections that can also cause disseminated disease in immunosuppressed patients. We identified a novel adenovirus, squirrel monkey adenovirus 1 (SqMAdV-1), as the cause of fatal infection in an immunocompromised squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis) at the Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research (KCCMR). Sequencing of SqMAdV-1 revealed that it is most closely related (80.4 % pairwise nucleotide identity) to the titi monkey (Plecturocebus cupreus) adenovirus (TMAdV). Although identified in the titi monkey, TMAdV is highly lethal in these monkeys, and they are not thought to be the natural host. While SqMAdV-1 is similar to other primate adenoviruses in size and genomic characteristics, a nucleotide polymorphism at the expected stop codon of the DNA polymerase gene results in a 126 amino acid extension at the carboxy terminus, a feature not previously observed among other primate adenoviruses. PCR testing and partial sequencing of 95 archived faecal samples from other squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis and Saimiri sciureus) housed at the KCCMR revealed the presence of three distinct, and apparently endemic species of adenoviruses. A grouping of ten squirrel monkey adenovirus variants has high similarity to SqMAdV-1. A single adenovirus variant (designated SqMAdV-3), detected in five monkeys, has similarity to tufted capuchin (Sapajus apella) adenoviruses. The largest group of adenovirus variants detected (designated SqMAdV-2.0-2.16) has very high similarity (93-99 %) to the TMAdV, suggesting that squirrel monkeys may be the natural host of the TMAdV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA.Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine Research, Department of Comparative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, USA.Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine Research, Department of Comparative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA.Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine Research, Department of Comparative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, USA.Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine Research, Department of Comparative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, USA.Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine Research, Department of Comparative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, USA.Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine Research, Department of Comparative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX, USA. Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32614763

Citation

Rogers, Donna L., et al. "Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus of Squirrel Monkeys After Fatal Infection During Immunosuppression." Microbial Genomics, 2020.
Rogers DL, Ruiz JC, Baze WB, et al. Epidemiological and molecular characterization of a novel adenovirus of squirrel monkeys after fatal infection during immunosuppression. Microb Genom. 2020.
Rogers, D. L., Ruiz, J. C., Baze, W. B., McClure, G. B., Smith, C., Urbanowski, R., Boston, T., Simmons, J. H., Williams, L., Abee, C. R., & Vanchiere, J. A. (2020). Epidemiological and molecular characterization of a novel adenovirus of squirrel monkeys after fatal infection during immunosuppression. Microbial Genomics. https://doi.org/10.1099/mgen.0.000395
Rogers DL, et al. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus of Squirrel Monkeys After Fatal Infection During Immunosuppression. Microb Genom. 2020 Jul 2; PubMed PMID: 32614763.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiological and molecular characterization of a novel adenovirus of squirrel monkeys after fatal infection during immunosuppression. AU - Rogers,Donna L, AU - Ruiz,Julio C, AU - Baze,Wallace B, AU - McClure,Gloria B, AU - Smith,Carolyn, AU - Urbanowski,Ricky, AU - Boston,Theresa, AU - Simmons,Joe H, AU - Williams,Lawrence, AU - Abee,Christian R, AU - Vanchiere,John A, Y1 - 2020/07/02/ PY - 2020/7/3/entrez PY - 2020/7/3/pubmed PY - 2020/7/3/medline KW - adenovirus KW - fatal infection KW - full genome sequence KW - immunosuppression KW - squirrel monkey JF - Microbial genomics JO - Microb Genom N2 - Adenoviruses are a frequent cause of acute upper respiratory tract infections that can also cause disseminated disease in immunosuppressed patients. We identified a novel adenovirus, squirrel monkey adenovirus 1 (SqMAdV-1), as the cause of fatal infection in an immunocompromised squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis) at the Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research (KCCMR). Sequencing of SqMAdV-1 revealed that it is most closely related (80.4 % pairwise nucleotide identity) to the titi monkey (Plecturocebus cupreus) adenovirus (TMAdV). Although identified in the titi monkey, TMAdV is highly lethal in these monkeys, and they are not thought to be the natural host. While SqMAdV-1 is similar to other primate adenoviruses in size and genomic characteristics, a nucleotide polymorphism at the expected stop codon of the DNA polymerase gene results in a 126 amino acid extension at the carboxy terminus, a feature not previously observed among other primate adenoviruses. PCR testing and partial sequencing of 95 archived faecal samples from other squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis and Saimiri sciureus) housed at the KCCMR revealed the presence of three distinct, and apparently endemic species of adenoviruses. A grouping of ten squirrel monkey adenovirus variants has high similarity to SqMAdV-1. A single adenovirus variant (designated SqMAdV-3), detected in five monkeys, has similarity to tufted capuchin (Sapajus apella) adenoviruses. The largest group of adenovirus variants detected (designated SqMAdV-2.0-2.16) has very high similarity (93-99 %) to the TMAdV, suggesting that squirrel monkeys may be the natural host of the TMAdV. SN - 2057-5858 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32614763/Epidemiological_and_molecular_characterization_of_a_novel_adenovirus_of_squirrel_monkeys_after_fatal_infection_during_immunosuppression L2 - http://mgen.microbiologyresearch.org/pubmed/content/journal/mgen/10.1099/mgen.0.000395 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.