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Poor oral health conditions and cognitive decline: Studies in humans and rats.
PLoS One. 2020; 15(7):e0234659.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The relationship between poor oral health conditions and cognitive decline is unclear.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between oral health and cognition in humans and rats.

METHODS

In humans: a cross-sectional study was conducted. Cognitive levels were evaluated by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE); oral conditions were reflected by the number of missing index teeth, bleeding on probing, and probing pocket depth (PD). In rats: a ligature-induced (Lig) periodontitis model and Aβ25-35-induced model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were established; tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex were detected.

RESULTS

MMSE scores for the number of missing index teeth ≥ 7 group were significantly lower than those in the ≤ 6 group. A negative relationship (correlation coefficient ρ = -0.310, P = 0.002) was observed between MMSE scores and number of missing index teeth. More missing index teeth and lower education levels were independent risk factors for cognitive decline. A negative relationship (correlation coefficient ρ = -0.214, P = 0.031) was observed between MMSE scores and average PD. TNF-α and IL-6 levels in the hippocampus of the Lig+AD group were significantly higher than those of the AD group. IL-1 and IL-6 levels in the cerebral cortex of the Lig+AD group were significantly higher than those of the AD group.

CONCLUSION

Poor oral health conditions including more missing index teeth and higher average PD may be risk factors for cognitive decline. Periodontitis may increase inflammatory cytokines in rat models of AD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nanjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Hospital of Stomatology, Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi, Guizhou, People's Republic of China.Nanjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Nanjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China. Hospital of Stomatology, Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi, Guizhou, People's Republic of China.Nanjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Nanjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.Hospital of Stomatology, Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi, Guizhou, People's Republic of China.Nanjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32614834

Citation

Zhang, Shuang, et al. "Poor Oral Health Conditions and Cognitive Decline: Studies in Humans and Rats." PloS One, vol. 15, no. 7, 2020, pp. e0234659.
Zhang S, Yang F, Wang Z, et al. Poor oral health conditions and cognitive decline: Studies in humans and rats. PLoS ONE. 2020;15(7):e0234659.
Zhang, S., Yang, F., Wang, Z., Qian, X., Ji, Y., Gong, L., Ge, S., & Yan, F. (2020). Poor oral health conditions and cognitive decline: Studies in humans and rats. PloS One, 15(7), e0234659. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0234659
Zhang S, et al. Poor Oral Health Conditions and Cognitive Decline: Studies in Humans and Rats. PLoS ONE. 2020;15(7):e0234659. PubMed PMID: 32614834.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Poor oral health conditions and cognitive decline: Studies in humans and rats. AU - Zhang,Shuang, AU - Yang,Fengchun, AU - Wang,Zezheng, AU - Qian,Xueshen, AU - Ji,Yan, AU - Gong,Ling, AU - Ge,Song, AU - Yan,Fuhua, Y1 - 2020/07/02/ PY - 2019/12/09/received PY - 2020/05/30/accepted PY - 2020/7/3/entrez PY - 2020/7/3/pubmed PY - 2020/7/3/medline SP - e0234659 EP - e0234659 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 15 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The relationship between poor oral health conditions and cognitive decline is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between oral health and cognition in humans and rats. METHODS: In humans: a cross-sectional study was conducted. Cognitive levels were evaluated by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE); oral conditions were reflected by the number of missing index teeth, bleeding on probing, and probing pocket depth (PD). In rats: a ligature-induced (Lig) periodontitis model and Aβ25-35-induced model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were established; tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex were detected. RESULTS: MMSE scores for the number of missing index teeth ≥ 7 group were significantly lower than those in the ≤ 6 group. A negative relationship (correlation coefficient ρ = -0.310, P = 0.002) was observed between MMSE scores and number of missing index teeth. More missing index teeth and lower education levels were independent risk factors for cognitive decline. A negative relationship (correlation coefficient ρ = -0.214, P = 0.031) was observed between MMSE scores and average PD. TNF-α and IL-6 levels in the hippocampus of the Lig+AD group were significantly higher than those of the AD group. IL-1 and IL-6 levels in the cerebral cortex of the Lig+AD group were significantly higher than those of the AD group. CONCLUSION: Poor oral health conditions including more missing index teeth and higher average PD may be risk factors for cognitive decline. Periodontitis may increase inflammatory cytokines in rat models of AD. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32614834/Poor_oral_health_conditions_and_cognitive_decline:_Studies_in_humans_and_rats L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0234659 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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