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Obstetrician-gynecologist and patient factors associated with intimate partner violence screening in a clinical setting.
Women Health. 2020 Jul 02 [Online ahead of print]WH

Abstract

Screening for intimate partner violence is recommended by the medical community. This study investigated obstetrician-gynecologists' intimate partner violence screening patterns and physician and patient factors associated with screening. Four hundred obstetricians-gynecologists completed the Physician Readiness to Manage Intimate Partner Violence Survey between December 2014 and July 2015. Their patients completed the Patient Safety and Satisfaction Survey. Hierarchical generalized linear modeling analyzed physician and patient variables related to the likelihood of being screened. Forty-four physicians responded. The viable patient response rate was 81.3 percent (n = 894) of patients from included physicians. Less than half (43.2 percent) of physicians reported screening during annual exams. There was a statistically significant difference for patient race/ethnicity (p < .03) and the number of previous doctor visits (p < .03) with not being screened. These patient-level variables accounted for approximately 68.3 percent of the variance screening odds. There was no significant difference (p < .10) between physicians' perceived preparation, knowledge, and attitudes for not being screened. The hierarchical generalized linear modeling analysis showed a trend for physicians with a high-perceived preparation for screening was related to initial visits. This study identified that obstetrician-gynecologists do not routinely screen for IPV and race/ethnicity and number of visits are factors in screening for intimate partner violence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Healing Place, PLLC , Washington, DC, USA.Department of Psychology, American University, American University , Washington, DC, USA.College of Nursing, The University of Alabama in Huntsville , Huntsville, AL, USA.Department of Public Health, University of North Florida , Jacksonville, FL, USA.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington , Seattle, WA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32615063

Citation

Jones, Katherine M., et al. "Obstetrician-gynecologist and Patient Factors Associated With Intimate Partner Violence Screening in a Clinical Setting." Women & Health, 2020, pp. 1-14.
Jones KM, Carter MM, Bianchi AL, et al. Obstetrician-gynecologist and patient factors associated with intimate partner violence screening in a clinical setting. Women Health. 2020.
Jones, K. M., Carter, M. M., Bianchi, A. L., Zeglin, R. J., & Schulkin, J. (2020). Obstetrician-gynecologist and patient factors associated with intimate partner violence screening in a clinical setting. Women & Health, 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1080/03630242.2020.1784368
Jones KM, et al. Obstetrician-gynecologist and Patient Factors Associated With Intimate Partner Violence Screening in a Clinical Setting. Women Health. 2020 Jul 2;1-14. PubMed PMID: 32615063.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obstetrician-gynecologist and patient factors associated with intimate partner violence screening in a clinical setting. AU - Jones,Katherine M, AU - Carter,Michele M, AU - Bianchi,Ann L, AU - Zeglin,Robert J, AU - Schulkin,Jay, Y1 - 2020/07/02/ PY - 2020/7/3/entrez PY - 2020/7/3/pubmed PY - 2020/7/3/medline KW - Domestic violence KW - gynecology screening KW - intimate partner violence KW - obstetrician-gynecologist KW - obstetrics KW - reproductive health KW - women’s health SP - 1 EP - 14 JF - Women & health JO - Women Health N2 - Screening for intimate partner violence is recommended by the medical community. This study investigated obstetrician-gynecologists' intimate partner violence screening patterns and physician and patient factors associated with screening. Four hundred obstetricians-gynecologists completed the Physician Readiness to Manage Intimate Partner Violence Survey between December 2014 and July 2015. Their patients completed the Patient Safety and Satisfaction Survey. Hierarchical generalized linear modeling analyzed physician and patient variables related to the likelihood of being screened. Forty-four physicians responded. The viable patient response rate was 81.3 percent (n = 894) of patients from included physicians. Less than half (43.2 percent) of physicians reported screening during annual exams. There was a statistically significant difference for patient race/ethnicity (p < .03) and the number of previous doctor visits (p < .03) with not being screened. These patient-level variables accounted for approximately 68.3 percent of the variance screening odds. There was no significant difference (p < .10) between physicians' perceived preparation, knowledge, and attitudes for not being screened. The hierarchical generalized linear modeling analysis showed a trend for physicians with a high-perceived preparation for screening was related to initial visits. This study identified that obstetrician-gynecologists do not routinely screen for IPV and race/ethnicity and number of visits are factors in screening for intimate partner violence. SN - 1541-0331 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32615063/Obstetrician-gynecologist_and_patient_factors_associated_with_intimate_partner_violence_screening_in_a_clinical_setting L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03630242.2020.1784368 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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