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Pieris brassicae eggs trigger interplant systemic acquired resistance against a foliar pathogen in Arabidopsis.
New Phytol. 2020 Jul 03 [Online ahead of print]NP

Abstract

Recognition of plant pathogens or herbivores activate a broad-spectrum plant defense priming in distal leaves against potential future attacks, leading to systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Additionally, attacked plants can release aerial or below-ground signals that trigger defense responses, such as SAR, in neighboring plants lacking initial exposure to pathogen or pest elicitors. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in interplant defense signal generation in sender plants and decoding in neighboring plants are not fully understood. We previously reported that Pieris brassicae eggs induce intraplant SAR against the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we extend this effect to neighboring plants by discovering an egg-induced interplant SAR via mobile root-derived signal(s). The generation of an egg-induced interplant SAR signal requires pipecolic acid (Pip) pathway genes ALD1 and FMO1 but occurs independently of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation in sender plants. Furthermore, reception of the signal leads to accumulation of SA in the recipient plants. In response to insect eggs, plants may induce interplant SAR to prepare for potential pathogen invasion following feeding-induced wounding or to keep neighboring plants healthy for hatching larvae. Our results highlight a previously uncharacterized below-ground plant-to-plant signaling mechanism and reveals genetic components required for its generation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, 1015, Switzerland.Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, 1015, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32619278

Citation

Orlovskis, Zigmunds, and Philippe Reymond. "Pieris Brassicae Eggs Trigger Interplant Systemic Acquired Resistance Against a Foliar Pathogen in Arabidopsis." The New Phytologist, 2020.
Orlovskis Z, Reymond P. Pieris brassicae eggs trigger interplant systemic acquired resistance against a foliar pathogen in Arabidopsis. New Phytol. 2020.
Orlovskis, Z., & Reymond, P. (2020). Pieris brassicae eggs trigger interplant systemic acquired resistance against a foliar pathogen in Arabidopsis. The New Phytologist. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.16788
Orlovskis Z, Reymond P. Pieris Brassicae Eggs Trigger Interplant Systemic Acquired Resistance Against a Foliar Pathogen in Arabidopsis. New Phytol. 2020 Jul 3; PubMed PMID: 32619278.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pieris brassicae eggs trigger interplant systemic acquired resistance against a foliar pathogen in Arabidopsis. AU - Orlovskis,Zigmunds, AU - Reymond,Philippe, Y1 - 2020/07/03/ PY - 2020/04/27/received PY - 2020/06/26/accepted PY - 2020/7/4/pubmed PY - 2020/7/4/medline PY - 2020/7/4/entrez KW - Below-ground signals KW - insect eggs KW - neighborhood effects KW - plant pathogens KW - plant-herbivore interactions KW - plant-plant interactions KW - systemic acquired resistance (SAR) JF - The New phytologist JO - New Phytol. N2 - Recognition of plant pathogens or herbivores activate a broad-spectrum plant defense priming in distal leaves against potential future attacks, leading to systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Additionally, attacked plants can release aerial or below-ground signals that trigger defense responses, such as SAR, in neighboring plants lacking initial exposure to pathogen or pest elicitors. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in interplant defense signal generation in sender plants and decoding in neighboring plants are not fully understood. We previously reported that Pieris brassicae eggs induce intraplant SAR against the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we extend this effect to neighboring plants by discovering an egg-induced interplant SAR via mobile root-derived signal(s). The generation of an egg-induced interplant SAR signal requires pipecolic acid (Pip) pathway genes ALD1 and FMO1 but occurs independently of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation in sender plants. Furthermore, reception of the signal leads to accumulation of SA in the recipient plants. In response to insect eggs, plants may induce interplant SAR to prepare for potential pathogen invasion following feeding-induced wounding or to keep neighboring plants healthy for hatching larvae. Our results highlight a previously uncharacterized below-ground plant-to-plant signaling mechanism and reveals genetic components required for its generation. SN - 1469-8137 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32619278/Pieris_brassicae_eggs_trigger_inter-plant_systemic_acquired_resistance_against_a_foliar_pathogen_in_Arabidopsis L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.16788 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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