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Continent-wide Shifts in Song Dialects of White-Throated Sparrows.
Curr Biol. 2020 Jun 30 [Online ahead of print]CB

Abstract

Hypotheses on regional song variation ("dialects") assume that dialects remain stable within regions, are distinct between regions, and persist within populations over extensive periods [1-3]. Theories to explain dialects focus on mechanisms that promote persistence of regional song variants despite gene flow between regions [4-6], such as juveniles settling in non-natal populations retaining only those songs from their repertoires that match neighbors [7, 8]. It would be considered atypical for a novel song variant to invade and replace the established regional variant. Yet some studies have reported song variants shifting rapidly over time within populations [9-11]. White-throated sparrows, Zonotrichia albicolis, for example, traditionally sing a whistled song terminating in a repeated triplet of notes [12], which was the ubiquitous variant in surveys across Canada in the 1960s [13]. However, doublet-ending songs emerged and replaced triplet-ending songs west of the Rocky Mountains sometime between 1960 and 2000 [11] and appeared just east of the Rockies in the 2000s [14]. From recordings collected over two decades across North America, we show that doublet-ending song has now spread at a continental scale. Using geolocator tracking, we confirm that birds from western Canada, where doublet-ending songs originated, overwinter with birds from central Canada, where the song initially spread. This suggests a potential mechanism for spread through song tutoring on wintering grounds. Where the new song variant has spread, it rose from a rare variant to the sole, regional song type, as predicted by the indirect biased transmission hypothesis [10]. VIDEO

ABSTRACT

.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada. Electronic address: ken.otter@unbc.ca.Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada.Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada; Steffi LaZerte Consulting, Brandon, MB R7A 3C4, Canada.Department of Biology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32619475

Citation

Otter, Ken A., et al. "Continent-wide Shifts in Song Dialects of White-Throated Sparrows." Current Biology : CB, 2020.
Otter KA, Mckenna A, LaZerte SE, et al. Continent-wide Shifts in Song Dialects of White-Throated Sparrows. Curr Biol. 2020.
Otter, K. A., Mckenna, A., LaZerte, S. E., & Ramsay, S. M. (2020). Continent-wide Shifts in Song Dialects of White-Throated Sparrows. Current Biology : CB. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2020.05.084
Otter KA, et al. Continent-wide Shifts in Song Dialects of White-Throated Sparrows. Curr Biol. 2020 Jun 30; PubMed PMID: 32619475.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Continent-wide Shifts in Song Dialects of White-Throated Sparrows. AU - Otter,Ken A, AU - Mckenna,Alexandra, AU - LaZerte,Stefanie E, AU - Ramsay,Scott M, Y1 - 2020/06/30/ PY - 2020/03/27/received PY - 2020/05/07/revised PY - 2020/05/27/accepted PY - 2020/7/4/entrez PY - 2020/7/4/pubmed PY - 2020/7/4/medline KW - Zonotrichia albicolis KW - bird song KW - cultural evolution KW - dialects KW - white-throated sparrows JF - Current biology : CB JO - Curr. Biol. N2 - Hypotheses on regional song variation ("dialects") assume that dialects remain stable within regions, are distinct between regions, and persist within populations over extensive periods [1-3]. Theories to explain dialects focus on mechanisms that promote persistence of regional song variants despite gene flow between regions [4-6], such as juveniles settling in non-natal populations retaining only those songs from their repertoires that match neighbors [7, 8]. It would be considered atypical for a novel song variant to invade and replace the established regional variant. Yet some studies have reported song variants shifting rapidly over time within populations [9-11]. White-throated sparrows, Zonotrichia albicolis, for example, traditionally sing a whistled song terminating in a repeated triplet of notes [12], which was the ubiquitous variant in surveys across Canada in the 1960s [13]. However, doublet-ending songs emerged and replaced triplet-ending songs west of the Rocky Mountains sometime between 1960 and 2000 [11] and appeared just east of the Rockies in the 2000s [14]. From recordings collected over two decades across North America, we show that doublet-ending song has now spread at a continental scale. Using geolocator tracking, we confirm that birds from western Canada, where doublet-ending songs originated, overwinter with birds from central Canada, where the song initially spread. This suggests a potential mechanism for spread through song tutoring on wintering grounds. Where the new song variant has spread, it rose from a rare variant to the sole, regional song type, as predicted by the indirect biased transmission hypothesis [10]. VIDEO ABSTRACT. SN - 1879-0445 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32619475/Continent-wide_Shifts_in_Song_Dialects_of_White-Throated_Sparrows L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0960-9822(20)30771-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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