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Fire's impact on threat detection and risk perception among vervet monkeys: Implications for hominin evolution.
J Hum Evol. 2020 Aug; 145:102836.JH

Abstract

The spatial behavior of primates is shaped by many factors including predation risk, the distribution of food sources, and access to water. In fire-prone settings, burning is a catalyst of change, altering the distribution of both plants and animals. Recent research has shown that primates alter their behavior in response to this change. Here, we study primates' perceived threat of predation in fire-modified landscapes. We focus on the predator-related behaviors of vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) after controlled burning events. We compare the occurrence of vigilance and predator-deterrent behaviors, including alarm calls, scanning, and flight across different habitats and burn conditions to test the hypothesis that subjects exhibit fewer predator-specific vigilance and predator-deterrent behaviors in burned areas. The results demonstrate that predator-related behaviors occur less often in burned habitats, suggesting that predators are less common in these areas. These results provide foundations for examining hypotheses about the use of fire-altered landscapes among extinct hominins. We set these data in the context of increasing aridity, changes in burning regimes, and the emergence of pyrophilia in the human lineage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anthropology, University of Denver, 2000 E. Asbury St., Denver, CO, 80208, USA. Electronic address: Nicole.herzog@du.edu.Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, 260 S. Central Campus Drive, Rm 4625 Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, 260 S. Central Campus Drive, Rm 4625 Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, 260 S. Central Campus Drive, Rm 4625 Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32619883

Citation

Herzog, Nicole M., et al. "Fire's Impact On Threat Detection and Risk Perception Among Vervet Monkeys: Implications for Hominin Evolution." Journal of Human Evolution, vol. 145, 2020, p. 102836.
Herzog NM, Parker C, Keefe E, et al. Fire's impact on threat detection and risk perception among vervet monkeys: Implications for hominin evolution. J Hum Evol. 2020;145:102836.
Herzog, N. M., Parker, C., Keefe, E., & Hawkes, K. (2020). Fire's impact on threat detection and risk perception among vervet monkeys: Implications for hominin evolution. Journal of Human Evolution, 145, 102836. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhevol.2020.102836
Herzog NM, et al. Fire's Impact On Threat Detection and Risk Perception Among Vervet Monkeys: Implications for Hominin Evolution. J Hum Evol. 2020;145:102836. PubMed PMID: 32619883.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fire's impact on threat detection and risk perception among vervet monkeys: Implications for hominin evolution. AU - Herzog,Nicole M, AU - Parker,Christopher, AU - Keefe,Earl, AU - Hawkes,Kristen, Y1 - 2020/06/30/ PY - 2019/04/23/received PY - 2020/05/19/revised PY - 2020/05/19/accepted PY - 2020/7/4/pubmed PY - 2020/7/4/medline PY - 2020/7/4/entrez KW - Behavioral ecology KW - Fire ecology KW - Hominin evolution KW - Primate predation KW - Pyrophilia KW - Spatiotemporal dynamics SP - 102836 EP - 102836 JF - Journal of human evolution JO - J. Hum. Evol. VL - 145 N2 - The spatial behavior of primates is shaped by many factors including predation risk, the distribution of food sources, and access to water. In fire-prone settings, burning is a catalyst of change, altering the distribution of both plants and animals. Recent research has shown that primates alter their behavior in response to this change. Here, we study primates' perceived threat of predation in fire-modified landscapes. We focus on the predator-related behaviors of vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) after controlled burning events. We compare the occurrence of vigilance and predator-deterrent behaviors, including alarm calls, scanning, and flight across different habitats and burn conditions to test the hypothesis that subjects exhibit fewer predator-specific vigilance and predator-deterrent behaviors in burned areas. The results demonstrate that predator-related behaviors occur less often in burned habitats, suggesting that predators are less common in these areas. These results provide foundations for examining hypotheses about the use of fire-altered landscapes among extinct hominins. We set these data in the context of increasing aridity, changes in burning regimes, and the emergence of pyrophilia in the human lineage. SN - 1095-8606 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32619883/Fire's_impact_on_threat_detection_and_risk_perception_among_vervet_monkeys:_Implications_for_hominin_evolution L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0047-2484(20)30097-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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