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Core Microbiota in Central Lung Cancer With Streptococcal Enrichment as a Possible Diagnostic Marker.
Arch Bronconeumol. 2020 Jun 30 [Online ahead of print]AB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dysbiosis in lung cancer has been underexplored. The aim of this study was to define the bacterial and fungal microbiota of the bronchi in central lung cancer and to compare it with that of the oral and intestinal compartments.

METHODS

Twenty-five patients with central lung cancer and sixteen controls without antimicrobial intake during the previous month were recruited. Bacterial and fungal distribution was determined by massive sequencing of bronchial biopsies and saliva and faecal samples. Complex computational analysis was performed to define the core lung microbiota.

RESULTS

Affected and contralateral bronchi of patients have almost identical microbiota dominated by Streptococcus, whereas Pseudomonas was the dominant genera in controls. Oral and pulmonary ecosystems were significantly more similar in patients, probably due to microaspirations. Streptococcal abundance in the bronchi differentiated patients from controls according to a ROC curve analysis (90.9% sensitivity, 83.3% specificity, AUC=0.897). The saliva of patients characteristically showed a greater abundance of Streptococcus, Rothia, Gemella and Lactobacillus. The mycobiome of controls (Candida) was significantly different from that of patients (Malassezia). Cancer patients' bronchial mycobiome was similar to their saliva, but different from their contralateral bronchi.

CONCLUSIONS

The central lung cancer microbiome shows high levels of Streptococcus, and differs significantly in its composition from that of control subjects. Changes are not restricted to tumour tissue, and seem to be the consequence of microaspirations from the oral cavity. These findings could be useful in the screening and even diagnosis of this disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Miguel Servet University Hospital, CIBERES, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (ISS) Aragón, Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: sbello@salud.aragon.es.Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Miguel Servet University Hospital, CIBERES, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (ISS) Aragón, Zaragoza, Spain.Department of Microbiology, Ramón y Cajal Health Investigation Institute (IRYCIS), Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain.Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Miguel Servet University Hospital, CIBERES, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (ISS) Aragón, Zaragoza, Spain.Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Miguel Servet University Hospital, CIBERES, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (ISS) Aragón, Zaragoza, Spain.Department of Microbiology, Miguel Servet University Hospital, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (ISS) Aragón, Zaragoza, Spain.Department of Pathology, Miguel Servet University Hospital, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (ISS) Aragón, Zaragoza, Spain.Complex Systems Group, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.Complex Systems Group, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.Department of Microbiology, Ramón y Cajal Health Investigation Institute (IRYCIS), Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain; University Alfonso X El Sabio, Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng spa

PubMed ID

32620417

Citation

Bello, Salvador, et al. "Core Microbiota in Central Lung Cancer With Streptococcal Enrichment as a Possible Diagnostic Marker." Archivos De Bronconeumologia, 2020.
Bello S, Vengoechea JJ, Ponce-Alonso M, et al. Core Microbiota in Central Lung Cancer With Streptococcal Enrichment as a Possible Diagnostic Marker. Arch Bronconeumol. 2020.
Bello, S., Vengoechea, J. J., Ponce-Alonso, M., Figueredo, A. L., Mincholé, E., Rezusta, A., Gambó, P., Pastor, J. M., Javier Galeano, ., & Del Campo, R. (2020). Core Microbiota in Central Lung Cancer With Streptococcal Enrichment as a Possible Diagnostic Marker. Archivos De Bronconeumologia. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arbres.2020.05.034
Bello S, et al. Core Microbiota in Central Lung Cancer With Streptococcal Enrichment as a Possible Diagnostic Marker. Arch Bronconeumol. 2020 Jun 30; PubMed PMID: 32620417.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Core Microbiota in Central Lung Cancer With Streptococcal Enrichment as a Possible Diagnostic Marker. AU - Bello,Salvador, AU - Vengoechea,José J, AU - Ponce-Alonso,Manuel, AU - Figueredo,Ana L, AU - Mincholé,Elisa, AU - Rezusta,Antonio, AU - Gambó,Paula, AU - Pastor,Juan Manuel, AU - Javier Galeano,, AU - Del Campo,Rosa, Y1 - 2020/06/30/ PY - 2020/03/30/received PY - 2020/04/24/revised PY - 2020/05/04/accepted PY - 2020/7/5/entrez KW - Bronchoscopy KW - Broncoscopia KW - Cáncer de pulmón KW - Lung cancer KW - Microaspiraciones KW - Microaspirations KW - Microbioma KW - Microbiome KW - Streptococcus JF - Archivos de bronconeumologia JO - Arch. Bronconeumol. N2 - BACKGROUND: Dysbiosis in lung cancer has been underexplored. The aim of this study was to define the bacterial and fungal microbiota of the bronchi in central lung cancer and to compare it with that of the oral and intestinal compartments. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with central lung cancer and sixteen controls without antimicrobial intake during the previous month were recruited. Bacterial and fungal distribution was determined by massive sequencing of bronchial biopsies and saliva and faecal samples. Complex computational analysis was performed to define the core lung microbiota. RESULTS: Affected and contralateral bronchi of patients have almost identical microbiota dominated by Streptococcus, whereas Pseudomonas was the dominant genera in controls. Oral and pulmonary ecosystems were significantly more similar in patients, probably due to microaspirations. Streptococcal abundance in the bronchi differentiated patients from controls according to a ROC curve analysis (90.9% sensitivity, 83.3% specificity, AUC=0.897). The saliva of patients characteristically showed a greater abundance of Streptococcus, Rothia, Gemella and Lactobacillus. The mycobiome of controls (Candida) was significantly different from that of patients (Malassezia). Cancer patients' bronchial mycobiome was similar to their saliva, but different from their contralateral bronchi. CONCLUSIONS: The central lung cancer microbiome shows high levels of Streptococcus, and differs significantly in its composition from that of control subjects. Changes are not restricted to tumour tissue, and seem to be the consequence of microaspirations from the oral cavity. These findings could be useful in the screening and even diagnosis of this disease. SN - 1579-2129 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32620417/Core_Microbiota_in_Central_Lung_Cancer_With_Streptococcal_Enrichment_as_a_Possible_Diagnostic_Marker L2 - http://www.archbronconeumol.org/en/linksolver/ft/pii/S0300-2896(20)30192-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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