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Baseline characteristics and risk factors for short-term outcomes in 132 COVID-19 patients with diabetes in Wuhan China: A retrospective study.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2020 Aug; 166:108299.DR

Abstract

AIMS

To investigate the clinical characteristics, laboratory findings and high- resolution CT (HRCT) features and to explore the risk factors for in-hospital death and complications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with diabetes.

METHODS

From Dec 31, 2019, to Apr 5, 2020, a total of 132 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients with diabetes from two hospitals were retrospectively included in our study. Clinical, laboratory and chest CT data were analyzed and compared between the two groups with an admission glucose level of ≤11 mmol/L (group 1) and >11 mmol/L (group 2). Logistic regression analyses were used to identify the risk factors associated with in-hospital death and complications.

RESULTS

Of 132 patients, 15 died in hospital and 113 were discharged. Patients in group 2 were more likely to require intensive care unit care (21.4% vs. 9.2%), to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (23.2% vs. 9.2%) and acute cardiac injury (12.5% vs. 1.3%), and had a higher death rate (19.6% vs. 5.3%) than group 1. In the multivariable analysis, patients with admission glucose of >11 mmol/l had an increased risk of death (OR: 7.629, 95%CI: 1.391-37.984) and in-hospital complications (OR: 3.232, 95%CI: 1.393-7.498). Admission d-dimer of ≥1.5 μg/mL (OR: 6.645, 95%CI: 1.212-36.444) and HRCT score of ≥10 (OR: 7.792, 95%CI: 2.195-28.958) were associated with increased odds of in-hospital death and complications, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

In COVID-19 patients with diabetes, poorly-controlled blood glucose (>11 mmol/L) may be associated with poor outcomes. Admission hyperglycemia, elevated d-dimer and high HRCT score are potential risk factors for adverse outcomes and death.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China; Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, China.Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China; Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, China.Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China; Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, China.Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China; Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, China.Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China; Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, China.Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China; Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, China.Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China; Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, China.Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China; Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, China. Electronic address: lisa2003627_1@163.com.Department of Radiology, Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital, No.1 Yintan Road, Dongxihu District, Wuhan 430022, China. Electronic address: 1024932023@qq.com.Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China; Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022, China. Electronic address: heshuishi@hust.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32623030

Citation

Li, Yumin, et al. "Baseline Characteristics and Risk Factors for Short-term Outcomes in 132 COVID-19 Patients With Diabetes in Wuhan China: a Retrospective Study." Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, vol. 166, 2020, p. 108299.
Li Y, Han X, Alwalid O, et al. Baseline characteristics and risk factors for short-term outcomes in 132 COVID-19 patients with diabetes in Wuhan China: A retrospective study. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2020;166:108299.
Li, Y., Han, X., Alwalid, O., Cui, Y., Cao, Y., Liu, J., Gu, J., Wang, L., Fan, Y., & Shi, H. (2020). Baseline characteristics and risk factors for short-term outcomes in 132 COVID-19 patients with diabetes in Wuhan China: A retrospective study. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 166, 108299. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2020.108299
Li Y, et al. Baseline Characteristics and Risk Factors for Short-term Outcomes in 132 COVID-19 Patients With Diabetes in Wuhan China: a Retrospective Study. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2020;166:108299. PubMed PMID: 32623030.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Baseline characteristics and risk factors for short-term outcomes in 132 COVID-19 patients with diabetes in Wuhan China: A retrospective study. AU - Li,Yumin, AU - Han,Xiaoyu, AU - Alwalid,Osamah, AU - Cui,Yue, AU - Cao,Yukun, AU - Liu,Jia, AU - Gu,Jin, AU - Wang,Lixia, AU - Fan,Yanqing, AU - Shi,Heshui, Y1 - 2020/07/03/ PY - 2020/05/19/received PY - 2020/06/03/revised PY - 2020/06/29/accepted PY - 2020/7/6/pubmed PY - 2020/9/22/medline PY - 2020/7/6/entrez KW - Coronavirus disease 2019 KW - Diabetes mellitus KW - High-resolution CT KW - Risk factors SP - 108299 EP - 108299 JF - Diabetes research and clinical practice JO - Diabetes Res Clin Pract VL - 166 N2 - AIMS: To investigate the clinical characteristics, laboratory findings and high- resolution CT (HRCT) features and to explore the risk factors for in-hospital death and complications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with diabetes. METHODS: From Dec 31, 2019, to Apr 5, 2020, a total of 132 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients with diabetes from two hospitals were retrospectively included in our study. Clinical, laboratory and chest CT data were analyzed and compared between the two groups with an admission glucose level of ≤11 mmol/L (group 1) and >11 mmol/L (group 2). Logistic regression analyses were used to identify the risk factors associated with in-hospital death and complications. RESULTS: Of 132 patients, 15 died in hospital and 113 were discharged. Patients in group 2 were more likely to require intensive care unit care (21.4% vs. 9.2%), to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (23.2% vs. 9.2%) and acute cardiac injury (12.5% vs. 1.3%), and had a higher death rate (19.6% vs. 5.3%) than group 1. In the multivariable analysis, patients with admission glucose of >11 mmol/l had an increased risk of death (OR: 7.629, 95%CI: 1.391-37.984) and in-hospital complications (OR: 3.232, 95%CI: 1.393-7.498). Admission d-dimer of ≥1.5 μg/mL (OR: 6.645, 95%CI: 1.212-36.444) and HRCT score of ≥10 (OR: 7.792, 95%CI: 2.195-28.958) were associated with increased odds of in-hospital death and complications, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In COVID-19 patients with diabetes, poorly-controlled blood glucose (>11 mmol/L) may be associated with poor outcomes. Admission hyperglycemia, elevated d-dimer and high HRCT score are potential risk factors for adverse outcomes and death. SN - 1872-8227 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32623030/Baseline_characteristics_and_risk_factors_for_short_term_outcomes_in_132_COVID_19_patients_with_diabetes_in_Wuhan_China:_A_retrospective_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0168-8227(20)30551-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -