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Metabolic elicitors of Pseudomonas fluorescens N 21.4 elicit flavonoid metabolism in blackberry fruit.
J Sci Food Agric. 2020 Jul 05 [Online ahead of print]JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The beneficial rhizobacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens N 21.4, and its metabolic elicitors were inoculated in commercial cultivars of blackberry plants (Rubus cv. Loch Ness). Phenolic compounds present in red and black fruit and the expression of structural marker genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway during fruit ripening were studied.

RESULTS

An inverse relationship between gene expression and accumulation of metabolites was seen, except for the RuDFR gene, which had a direct correlation with cyanidin 3-O-glucoside synthesis, increasing its content 1.3 times when RuDFR was overexpressed in the red fruit of plants inoculated with the metabolic elicitors of P. fluorescens N 21.4, compared with red fruit of plants inoculated with N 21.4. The RuCHS gene also had a fundamental role in the accumulation of metabolites. Both rhizobacterium and metabolic elicitors triggered the flavonoid metabolism, enhancing the catechin and epicatechin content between 1.1 and 1.6 times in the case of red fruit and between 1.1 and 1.8 times in the case of black fruit. Both treatments also boosted the anthocyanin, quercetin, and kaempferol derivative content, highlighting the effects of metabolic elicitors in red fruit and the effects of live rhizobacterium in black fruit.

CONCLUSION

The metabolic elicitors' capacity to modulate gene expression and to increase secondary metabolites content was demonstrated. This work therefore suggests that they are effective, affordable, easily manageable, and ecofriendly plant inoculants that complement, or are alternatives to, beneficial rhizobacteria. © 2020 Society of Chemical Industry.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Plant Physiology, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidad San Pablo-CEU Universities, Boadilla del Monte, Spain.Plant Physiology, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidad San Pablo-CEU Universities, Boadilla del Monte, Spain.Plant Physiology, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidad San Pablo-CEU Universities, Boadilla del Monte, Spain.Plant Physiology, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidad San Pablo-CEU Universities, Boadilla del Monte, Spain.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32623714

Citation

Martin-Rivilla, Helena, et al. "Metabolic Elicitors of Pseudomonas Fluorescens N 21.4 Elicit Flavonoid Metabolism in Blackberry Fruit." Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 2020.
Martin-Rivilla H, Garcia-Villaraco A, Ramos-Solano B, et al. Metabolic elicitors of Pseudomonas fluorescens N 21.4 elicit flavonoid metabolism in blackberry fruit. J Sci Food Agric. 2020.
Martin-Rivilla, H., Garcia-Villaraco, A., Ramos-Solano, B., Gutierrez-Manero, F. J., & Lucas, J. A. (2020). Metabolic elicitors of Pseudomonas fluorescens N 21.4 elicit flavonoid metabolism in blackberry fruit. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.10632
Martin-Rivilla H, et al. Metabolic Elicitors of Pseudomonas Fluorescens N 21.4 Elicit Flavonoid Metabolism in Blackberry Fruit. J Sci Food Agric. 2020 Jul 5; PubMed PMID: 32623714.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic elicitors of Pseudomonas fluorescens N 21.4 elicit flavonoid metabolism in blackberry fruit. AU - Martin-Rivilla,Helena, AU - Garcia-Villaraco,Ana, AU - Ramos-Solano,Beatriz, AU - Gutierrez-Manero,Francisco J, AU - Lucas,José A, Y1 - 2020/07/05/ PY - 2020/04/14/received PY - 2020/06/09/revised PY - 2020/07/05/accepted PY - 2020/7/6/pubmed PY - 2020/7/6/medline PY - 2020/7/6/entrez KW - Pseudomonas fluorescens N 21.4 KW - RuCHS gene KW - RuDFR gene KW - blackberries KW - flavonoid metabolism KW - metabolic elicitors JF - Journal of the science of food and agriculture JO - J. Sci. Food Agric. N2 - BACKGROUND: The beneficial rhizobacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens N 21.4, and its metabolic elicitors were inoculated in commercial cultivars of blackberry plants (Rubus cv. Loch Ness). Phenolic compounds present in red and black fruit and the expression of structural marker genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway during fruit ripening were studied. RESULTS: An inverse relationship between gene expression and accumulation of metabolites was seen, except for the RuDFR gene, which had a direct correlation with cyanidin 3-O-glucoside synthesis, increasing its content 1.3 times when RuDFR was overexpressed in the red fruit of plants inoculated with the metabolic elicitors of P. fluorescens N 21.4, compared with red fruit of plants inoculated with N 21.4. The RuCHS gene also had a fundamental role in the accumulation of metabolites. Both rhizobacterium and metabolic elicitors triggered the flavonoid metabolism, enhancing the catechin and epicatechin content between 1.1 and 1.6 times in the case of red fruit and between 1.1 and 1.8 times in the case of black fruit. Both treatments also boosted the anthocyanin, quercetin, and kaempferol derivative content, highlighting the effects of metabolic elicitors in red fruit and the effects of live rhizobacterium in black fruit. CONCLUSION: The metabolic elicitors' capacity to modulate gene expression and to increase secondary metabolites content was demonstrated. This work therefore suggests that they are effective, affordable, easily manageable, and ecofriendly plant inoculants that complement, or are alternatives to, beneficial rhizobacteria. © 2020 Society of Chemical Industry. SN - 1097-0010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32623714/Metabolic_elicitors_of_Pseudomonas_fluorescens_N_21.4_elicit_flavonoid_metabolism_in_blackberry_fruit L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.10632 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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