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Leukocyte-dependent effects of platelet-rich plasma on cartilage loss and thermal hyperalgesia in a mouse model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.
Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2020 Jul 03 [Online ahead of print]OC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an emerging therapeutic strategy for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA); however, there is a lack of preclinical and clinical evidence for its efficacy and its mechanism of action is unclear. In the current study, we utilized leukocyte poor-PRP (LP-PRP) and leukocyte rich-PRP (LR-PRP) to mimic clinical point of care formulations and assessed their potential to alter disease progression in a mouse model of post-traumatic OA.

METHOD

Three-month-old wild-type male FVB/N mice received destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery to induce OA. To assess the efficacy of LP-PRP and LR-PRP, mice were given intraarticular injections at 2-, 7- and 28-days post-surgery. Mice were then assessed at 5-, 9-, and 13-weeks post-surgery for changes in chronic pain using the hot plate nociceptive assay. At 14-weeks, OA pathogenesis was evaluated using histology and phase-contrast μCT.

RESULTS

Treatment with LP-PRP and to a lesser extent LR-PRP preserved cartilage volume and surface area compared to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as measured by phase-contrast μCT. However, both treatments had higher Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) and synovitis scores compared to sham, and neither substantially improved scores compared to PBS controls. With respect to thermal hyperalgesia, PBS-treated mice displayed reduced latency to response compared to sham, and LR-PRP but not LP-PRP improved latency to response at 5-, 9- and 13-weeks post-surgery compared to PBS.

CONCLUSION

The results of this study suggest that effects of PRP therapy on OA progression and disease-induced hyperalgesia may be leukocyte-dependent. And while LP-PRP and to a lesser extent LR-PRP protect from volume and surface loss, significant pathology is still seen within OA joints. Future work is needed to understand how the different components of PRP effect OA pathogenesis and pain, and how these could be modified to achieve greater therapeutic efficacy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

H. Ben Taub Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address: blee@bcm.edu.Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address: grol@bcm.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32629163

Citation

Jayaram, P, et al. "Leukocyte-dependent Effects of Platelet-rich Plasma On Cartilage Loss and Thermal Hyperalgesia in a Mouse Model of Post-traumatic Osteoarthritis." Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 2020.
Jayaram P, Liu C, Dawson B, et al. Leukocyte-dependent effects of platelet-rich plasma on cartilage loss and thermal hyperalgesia in a mouse model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Osteoarthr Cartil. 2020.
Jayaram, P., Liu, C., Dawson, B., Ketkar, S., Patel, S. J., Lee, B. H., & Grol, M. W. (2020). Leukocyte-dependent effects of platelet-rich plasma on cartilage loss and thermal hyperalgesia in a mouse model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2020.06.004
Jayaram P, et al. Leukocyte-dependent Effects of Platelet-rich Plasma On Cartilage Loss and Thermal Hyperalgesia in a Mouse Model of Post-traumatic Osteoarthritis. Osteoarthr Cartil. 2020 Jul 3; PubMed PMID: 32629163.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Leukocyte-dependent effects of platelet-rich plasma on cartilage loss and thermal hyperalgesia in a mouse model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. AU - Jayaram,P, AU - Liu,C, AU - Dawson,B, AU - Ketkar,S, AU - Patel,S J, AU - Lee,B H, AU - Grol,M W, Y1 - 2020/07/03/ PY - 2019/11/12/received PY - 2020/06/14/revised PY - 2020/06/22/accepted PY - 2020/7/7/pubmed PY - 2020/7/7/medline PY - 2020/7/7/entrez KW - Leukocyte KW - Osteoarthritis KW - PRP KW - Platelet-rich plasma JF - Osteoarthritis and cartilage JO - Osteoarthr. Cartil. N2 - OBJECTIVE: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an emerging therapeutic strategy for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA); however, there is a lack of preclinical and clinical evidence for its efficacy and its mechanism of action is unclear. In the current study, we utilized leukocyte poor-PRP (LP-PRP) and leukocyte rich-PRP (LR-PRP) to mimic clinical point of care formulations and assessed their potential to alter disease progression in a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. METHOD: Three-month-old wild-type male FVB/N mice received destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery to induce OA. To assess the efficacy of LP-PRP and LR-PRP, mice were given intraarticular injections at 2-, 7- and 28-days post-surgery. Mice were then assessed at 5-, 9-, and 13-weeks post-surgery for changes in chronic pain using the hot plate nociceptive assay. At 14-weeks, OA pathogenesis was evaluated using histology and phase-contrast μCT. RESULTS: Treatment with LP-PRP and to a lesser extent LR-PRP preserved cartilage volume and surface area compared to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as measured by phase-contrast μCT. However, both treatments had higher Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) and synovitis scores compared to sham, and neither substantially improved scores compared to PBS controls. With respect to thermal hyperalgesia, PBS-treated mice displayed reduced latency to response compared to sham, and LR-PRP but not LP-PRP improved latency to response at 5-, 9- and 13-weeks post-surgery compared to PBS. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that effects of PRP therapy on OA progression and disease-induced hyperalgesia may be leukocyte-dependent. And while LP-PRP and to a lesser extent LR-PRP protect from volume and surface loss, significant pathology is still seen within OA joints. Future work is needed to understand how the different components of PRP effect OA pathogenesis and pain, and how these could be modified to achieve greater therapeutic efficacy. SN - 1522-9653 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32629163/Leukocyte-Dependent_Effects_of_Platelet_Rich_Plasma_on_Cartilage_Loss_and_Thermal_Hyperalgesia_in_a_Mouse_Model_of_Post-Traumatic_Osteoarthritis L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1063-4584(20)31055-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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