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Effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on maternal and infant complications.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2020 Jul 06; 20(1):390.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The potential effects of pre-pregnancy body mass (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on pregnancy outcomes remain unclear. Thus, we investigated socio-demographic characteristics that affect pre-pregnancy BMIs and GWG and the effects of pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG on Chinese maternal and infant complications.

METHODS

3172 women were enrolled in the Chinese Pregnant Women Cohort Study-Peking Union Medical College from July 25, 2017 to July 24, 2018, whose babies were delivered before December 31, 2018. Regression analysis was employed to evaluate the socio-demographic characteristics affecting pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG values and their effects on adverse maternal and infant complications.

RESULTS

Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age groups < 20 years (OR: 1.97), 25-30 years (OR: 1.66), 30-35 years (OR: 2.24), 35-40 years (OR: 3.90) and ≥ 40 years (OR: 3.33) as well as elementary school or education below (OR: 3.53), middle school (OR: 1.53), high school (OR: 1.40), and living in the north (OR: 1.37) were risk factors in maintaining a normal pre-pregnancy BMI. An age range of 30-35 years (OR: 0.76), living in the north (OR: 1.32) and race of ethnic minorities (OR: 1.51) were factors affecting GWG. Overweight (OR: 2.01) and inadequate GWG (OR: 1.60) were risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Overweight (OR: 2.80) and obesity (OR: 5.42) were risk factors for gestational hypertension (GHp). Overweight (OR: 1.92), obesity (OR: 2.48) and excessive GWG (OR: 1.95) were risk factors for macrosomia. Overweight and excessive GWG were risk factors for a large gestational age (LGA) and inadequate GWG was a risk factor for low birth weights.

CONCLUSIONS

Overweight and obesity before pregnancy and an excessive GWG are associated with a greater risk of developing GDM, GHp, macrosomia and LGA. The control of body weight before and during the course of pregnancy is recommended to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes, especially in pregnant women aged < 20 or > 25 years old educated below university and college levels, for ethnic minorities and those women who live in the north of China.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

Registered at Clinical Trials (NCT03403543), September 29, 2017.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, No. 1 Shuaifuyuan Wangfujing, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, No. 1 Shuaifuyuan Wangfujing, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, No. 1 Shuaifuyuan Wangfujing, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, No. 1 Shuaifuyuan Wangfujing, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China. maliangkun@pumch.cn.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, No. 9 Dongdan Santiao, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China. jiangyu@pumc.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32631269

Citation

Sun, Yin, et al. "Effects of Pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain On Maternal and Infant Complications." BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, vol. 20, no. 1, 2020, p. 390.
Sun Y, Shen Z, Zhan Y, et al. Effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on maternal and infant complications. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2020;20(1):390.
Sun, Y., Shen, Z., Zhan, Y., Wang, Y., Ma, S., Zhang, S., Liu, J., Wu, S., Feng, Y., Chen, Y., Cai, S., Shi, Y., Ma, L., & Jiang, Y. (2020). Effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on maternal and infant complications. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 20(1), 390. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-020-03071-y
Sun Y, et al. Effects of Pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain On Maternal and Infant Complications. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2020 Jul 6;20(1):390. PubMed PMID: 32631269.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on maternal and infant complications. AU - Sun,Yin, AU - Shen,Zhongzhou, AU - Zhan,Yongle, AU - Wang,Yawen, AU - Ma,Shuai, AU - Zhang,Suhan, AU - Liu,Juntao, AU - Wu,Sansan, AU - Feng,Yahui, AU - Chen,Yunli, AU - Cai,Shuya, AU - Shi,Yingjie, AU - Ma,Liangkun, AU - Jiang,Yu, Y1 - 2020/07/06/ PY - 2020/01/22/received PY - 2020/06/19/accepted PY - 2020/7/8/entrez PY - 2020/7/8/pubmed PY - 2021/2/17/medline KW - Chinese pregnant women KW - Cohort study KW - Gestational weight gain KW - Maternal outcomes KW - Neonatal outcomes KW - Pre-pregnancy BMI SP - 390 EP - 390 JF - BMC pregnancy and childbirth JO - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The potential effects of pre-pregnancy body mass (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on pregnancy outcomes remain unclear. Thus, we investigated socio-demographic characteristics that affect pre-pregnancy BMIs and GWG and the effects of pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG on Chinese maternal and infant complications. METHODS: 3172 women were enrolled in the Chinese Pregnant Women Cohort Study-Peking Union Medical College from July 25, 2017 to July 24, 2018, whose babies were delivered before December 31, 2018. Regression analysis was employed to evaluate the socio-demographic characteristics affecting pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG values and their effects on adverse maternal and infant complications. RESULTS: Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age groups < 20 years (OR: 1.97), 25-30 years (OR: 1.66), 30-35 years (OR: 2.24), 35-40 years (OR: 3.90) and ≥ 40 years (OR: 3.33) as well as elementary school or education below (OR: 3.53), middle school (OR: 1.53), high school (OR: 1.40), and living in the north (OR: 1.37) were risk factors in maintaining a normal pre-pregnancy BMI. An age range of 30-35 years (OR: 0.76), living in the north (OR: 1.32) and race of ethnic minorities (OR: 1.51) were factors affecting GWG. Overweight (OR: 2.01) and inadequate GWG (OR: 1.60) were risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Overweight (OR: 2.80) and obesity (OR: 5.42) were risk factors for gestational hypertension (GHp). Overweight (OR: 1.92), obesity (OR: 2.48) and excessive GWG (OR: 1.95) were risk factors for macrosomia. Overweight and excessive GWG were risk factors for a large gestational age (LGA) and inadequate GWG was a risk factor for low birth weights. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obesity before pregnancy and an excessive GWG are associated with a greater risk of developing GDM, GHp, macrosomia and LGA. The control of body weight before and during the course of pregnancy is recommended to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes, especially in pregnant women aged < 20 or > 25 years old educated below university and college levels, for ethnic minorities and those women who live in the north of China. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registered at Clinical Trials (NCT03403543), September 29, 2017. SN - 1471-2393 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32631269/Effects_of_pre_pregnancy_body_mass_index_and_gestational_weight_gain_on_maternal_and_infant_complications_ L2 - https://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12884-020-03071-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -