Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Endoscopic sclerotherapy versus endoscopic variceal ligation: esophageal symptoms, complications, and motility.
Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Nov; 83(11):1240-4.AJ

Abstract

Endoscopic sclerotherapy is an effective method for treating bleeding esophageal varices. However, a number of complications may limit its usefulness. A newly developed method for treating bleeding varices, endoscopic variceal ligation, that uses small rubber bands to occlude and eradicate the varices, may cause less damage to the esophagus. Twenty-eight patients (seven with no prior treatment, eight undergoing sclerotherapy, and 12 undergoing variceal ligation) were evaluated with a symptom questionnaire and esophageal manometry. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressures in the three groups did not differ. The percent LES relaxation was significantly (p = 0.04) less in the sclerotherapy group than in the untreated group. Contraction waves in the esophageal body were not different in amplitude, duration, and propagation speed in the three groups. There was no increase in the amount of heartburn after either form of treatment. Eight of the nine sclerotherapy patients had a stricture after treatment that required dilatation, whereas none of the ligation patients had strictures. We conclude from this that early in the course of sclerotherapy, stricture formation is common, but any long-lasting adverse effect on esophageal function is minimal. We also conclude variceal ligation therapy causes less esophageal dysfunction and has fewer local complications. Thus, endoscopic variceal ligation may be a safer and more easily tolerated alternative to endoscopic sclerotherapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3263792

Citation

Goff, J S., et al. "Endoscopic Sclerotherapy Versus Endoscopic Variceal Ligation: Esophageal Symptoms, Complications, and Motility." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 83, no. 11, 1988, pp. 1240-4.
Goff JS, Reveille RM, Van Stiegmann G. Endoscopic sclerotherapy versus endoscopic variceal ligation: esophageal symptoms, complications, and motility. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988;83(11):1240-4.
Goff, J. S., Reveille, R. M., & Van Stiegmann, G. (1988). Endoscopic sclerotherapy versus endoscopic variceal ligation: esophageal symptoms, complications, and motility. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 83(11), 1240-4.
Goff JS, Reveille RM, Van Stiegmann G. Endoscopic Sclerotherapy Versus Endoscopic Variceal Ligation: Esophageal Symptoms, Complications, and Motility. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988;83(11):1240-4. PubMed PMID: 3263792.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Endoscopic sclerotherapy versus endoscopic variceal ligation: esophageal symptoms, complications, and motility. AU - Goff,J S, AU - Reveille,R M, AU - Van Stiegmann,G, PY - 1988/11/1/pubmed PY - 1988/11/1/medline PY - 1988/11/1/entrez SP - 1240 EP - 4 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 83 IS - 11 N2 - Endoscopic sclerotherapy is an effective method for treating bleeding esophageal varices. However, a number of complications may limit its usefulness. A newly developed method for treating bleeding varices, endoscopic variceal ligation, that uses small rubber bands to occlude and eradicate the varices, may cause less damage to the esophagus. Twenty-eight patients (seven with no prior treatment, eight undergoing sclerotherapy, and 12 undergoing variceal ligation) were evaluated with a symptom questionnaire and esophageal manometry. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressures in the three groups did not differ. The percent LES relaxation was significantly (p = 0.04) less in the sclerotherapy group than in the untreated group. Contraction waves in the esophageal body were not different in amplitude, duration, and propagation speed in the three groups. There was no increase in the amount of heartburn after either form of treatment. Eight of the nine sclerotherapy patients had a stricture after treatment that required dilatation, whereas none of the ligation patients had strictures. We conclude from this that early in the course of sclerotherapy, stricture formation is common, but any long-lasting adverse effect on esophageal function is minimal. We also conclude variceal ligation therapy causes less esophageal dysfunction and has fewer local complications. Thus, endoscopic variceal ligation may be a safer and more easily tolerated alternative to endoscopic sclerotherapy. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3263792/Endoscopic_sclerotherapy_versus_endoscopic_variceal_ligation:_esophageal_symptoms_complications_and_motility_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -