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Impeding factors of early rehabilitation postoperatively after rheumatoid toe arthroplasty: a single-center retrospective cohort study.
JA Clin Rep. 2020 Jul 07; 6(1):50.JC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Previous studies explored the benefits related to early ambulation postoperatively, but few focused on patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We retrospectively evaluated the incidence and predictors of the inability to begin walking on the first postoperative day (POD) after toe arthroplasty for rheumatoid arthritis.

METHODS

RA patients who underwent toe arthroplasty at one hospital were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 300 patients were included and divided into two groups: possible group (n = 191), who were able to walk on the first POD, and impossible group (n = 109), who were unable to walk on the first POD. Data were analyzed using odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) between various patient factors and the impossible group with logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS

The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting before rehabilitation was significantly associated with the infeasibility of walking rehabilitation on the first POD [OR = 2.43, 95% CI 1.22-4.14, P = 0.003]. The number of rescue analgesics administered before rehabilitation and the supplementation of peripheral nerve block was also associated with the infeasibility of walking rehabilitation on the first POD [OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.59, P = 0.003; OR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.20-0.79, P = 0.010, respectively].

CONCLUSION

The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and inadequate postoperative pain management hindered early rehabilitation. Adding peripheral nerve block to general anesthesia had an advantage for postoperative rehabilitation after toe arthroplasty for rheumatoid arthritis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anesthesiology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan. goto.shunsaku@twmu.ac.jp.Department of Anesthesiology, TMG Asaka Medical Center, 1340-1 Mizonuma, Asaka-shi, Saitama, Japan.Department of Anesthesiology, Mejiro hospital, 3-22-23 shimoochiai, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Anesthesiology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32638138

Citation

Goto, Shunsaku, et al. "Impeding Factors of Early Rehabilitation Postoperatively After Rheumatoid Toe Arthroplasty: a Single-center Retrospective Cohort Study." JA Clinical Reports, vol. 6, no. 1, 2020, p. 50.
Goto S, Kasuya Y, Okuyama K, et al. Impeding factors of early rehabilitation postoperatively after rheumatoid toe arthroplasty: a single-center retrospective cohort study. JA Clin Rep. 2020;6(1):50.
Goto, S., Kasuya, Y., Okuyama, K., Ikari, K., & Ozaki, M. (2020). Impeding factors of early rehabilitation postoperatively after rheumatoid toe arthroplasty: a single-center retrospective cohort study. JA Clinical Reports, 6(1), 50. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40981-020-00356-1
Goto S, et al. Impeding Factors of Early Rehabilitation Postoperatively After Rheumatoid Toe Arthroplasty: a Single-center Retrospective Cohort Study. JA Clin Rep. 2020 Jul 7;6(1):50. PubMed PMID: 32638138.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impeding factors of early rehabilitation postoperatively after rheumatoid toe arthroplasty: a single-center retrospective cohort study. AU - Goto,Shunsaku, AU - Kasuya,Yusuke, AU - Okuyama,Keiko, AU - Ikari,Katsunori, AU - Ozaki,Makoto, Y1 - 2020/07/07/ PY - 2020/05/22/received PY - 2020/07/02/accepted PY - 2020/7/9/entrez PY - 2020/7/9/pubmed PY - 2020/7/9/medline KW - Arthroplasty KW - Pain management KW - Peripheral nerve block KW - Postoperative pain KW - Rehabilitation KW - Rheumatoid arthritis KW - Walking rehabilitation SP - 50 EP - 50 JF - JA clinical reports JO - JA Clin Rep VL - 6 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Previous studies explored the benefits related to early ambulation postoperatively, but few focused on patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We retrospectively evaluated the incidence and predictors of the inability to begin walking on the first postoperative day (POD) after toe arthroplasty for rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: RA patients who underwent toe arthroplasty at one hospital were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 300 patients were included and divided into two groups: possible group (n = 191), who were able to walk on the first POD, and impossible group (n = 109), who were unable to walk on the first POD. Data were analyzed using odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) between various patient factors and the impossible group with logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting before rehabilitation was significantly associated with the infeasibility of walking rehabilitation on the first POD [OR = 2.43, 95% CI 1.22-4.14, P = 0.003]. The number of rescue analgesics administered before rehabilitation and the supplementation of peripheral nerve block was also associated with the infeasibility of walking rehabilitation on the first POD [OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.59, P = 0.003; OR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.20-0.79, P = 0.010, respectively]. CONCLUSION: The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and inadequate postoperative pain management hindered early rehabilitation. Adding peripheral nerve block to general anesthesia had an advantage for postoperative rehabilitation after toe arthroplasty for rheumatoid arthritis. SN - 2363-9024 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32638138/Impeding_factors_of_early_rehabilitation_postoperatively_after_rheumatoid_toe_arthroplasty:_a_single-center_retrospective_cohort_study L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/32638138/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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