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Stress and Perception of Procedural Pain Management in Chinese Parents of Children with Cancer.
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2020 Jul 05 [Online ahead of print]JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Children with cancer are exposed to repeated painful and invasive procedures. This study examines Chinese parents' stress and perception towards their children's procedural pain-control.

METHODS

We recruited 265 parents of children (aged <18 years) diagnosed with hematological cancer (74.7%) and solid tumors (25.3%) from two major public hospitals. Parents used a scale (0-10) to rate perceived pain experienced by their child when undergoing lumbar puncture (LP), bone marrow aspirate or/and biopsy. They reported their stress level and attitudes towards analgesics using the adapted Pain Flexibility Scale for Parents and Parental Medication Attitude Questionnaire. General linear modelling was used to identify factors associated with perception outcomes.

RESULTS

Parents (72.8% mothers, age 36.5[6.8] years) expressed that they were worried (31.7%) and had difficulty with concentration (57.7%) when the child was in pain. Among parents whose children had undergone LP (n=207), 39.1% perceived that their child still experienced severe pain (pain score>7) even with existing pain control measures. Parents reported concerns over side effects of analgesics (69.4%) and addiction (35.1%). Half of the parents (47.2%) perceived that analgesics should only be reserved for severe pain. Parents who were older (Estimate=2.07, SE=0.87; P=0.0054) and had lower education attainment (Estimate=-3.38, SE=1.09; P=0.0021) had a more negative attitude towards analgesics use. Higher parental distress was associated with avoidance of analgesics use (rs=0.17, P=0.0052).

CONCLUSION

Our findings suggested that subgroups of Chinese parents demonstrated distress with their child's pain and harbored misconceptions over analgesics use. Future work includes devising targeted psychoeducation interventions for these parents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Guangzhou, China.The Nethersole School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR.School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR.School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR.Department of Pediatrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China.Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Guangzhou, China.The Nethersole School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR.Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR; Department of Oncology/Hematology, Hong Kong Children's Hospital, Hong Kong SAR.Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: zhanghuirjh@gwcmc.org.The Nethersole School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR. Electronic address: yinting.cheung@cuhk.edu.hk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32640278

Citation

Yan, Cuixia, et al. "Stress and Perception of Procedural Pain Management in Chinese Parents of Children With Cancer." Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 2020.
Yan C, Cheung R, Lee Wong C, et al. Stress and Perception of Procedural Pain Management in Chinese Parents of Children with Cancer. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2020.
Yan, C., Cheung, R., Lee Wong, C., Cheng, H. Y., Liu, F., Huang, H., Ewig, C., Li, C. K., Zhang, H., & Cheung, Y. T. (2020). Stress and Perception of Procedural Pain Management in Chinese Parents of Children with Cancer. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2020.06.028
Yan C, et al. Stress and Perception of Procedural Pain Management in Chinese Parents of Children With Cancer. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2020 Jul 5; PubMed PMID: 32640278.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stress and Perception of Procedural Pain Management in Chinese Parents of Children with Cancer. AU - Yan,Cuixia, AU - Cheung,Rita, AU - Lee Wong,Cho, AU - Cheng,Ho Yu, AU - Liu,Fengying, AU - Huang,Haiying, AU - Ewig,Celeste, AU - Li,Chi-Kong, AU - Zhang,Hui, AU - Cheung,Yin Ting, Y1 - 2020/07/05/ PY - 2020/04/24/received PY - 2020/06/04/revised PY - 2020/06/22/accepted PY - 2020/7/9/entrez PY - 2020/7/9/pubmed PY - 2020/7/9/medline KW - Painful procedures KW - analgesics KW - parents KW - pediatric cancer KW - procedural pain KW - supportive care JF - Journal of pain and symptom management JO - J Pain Symptom Manage N2 - OBJECTIVES: Children with cancer are exposed to repeated painful and invasive procedures. This study examines Chinese parents' stress and perception towards their children's procedural pain-control. METHODS: We recruited 265 parents of children (aged <18 years) diagnosed with hematological cancer (74.7%) and solid tumors (25.3%) from two major public hospitals. Parents used a scale (0-10) to rate perceived pain experienced by their child when undergoing lumbar puncture (LP), bone marrow aspirate or/and biopsy. They reported their stress level and attitudes towards analgesics using the adapted Pain Flexibility Scale for Parents and Parental Medication Attitude Questionnaire. General linear modelling was used to identify factors associated with perception outcomes. RESULTS: Parents (72.8% mothers, age 36.5[6.8] years) expressed that they were worried (31.7%) and had difficulty with concentration (57.7%) when the child was in pain. Among parents whose children had undergone LP (n=207), 39.1% perceived that their child still experienced severe pain (pain score>7) even with existing pain control measures. Parents reported concerns over side effects of analgesics (69.4%) and addiction (35.1%). Half of the parents (47.2%) perceived that analgesics should only be reserved for severe pain. Parents who were older (Estimate=2.07, SE=0.87; P=0.0054) and had lower education attainment (Estimate=-3.38, SE=1.09; P=0.0021) had a more negative attitude towards analgesics use. Higher parental distress was associated with avoidance of analgesics use (rs=0.17, P=0.0052). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggested that subgroups of Chinese parents demonstrated distress with their child's pain and harbored misconceptions over analgesics use. Future work includes devising targeted psychoeducation interventions for these parents. SN - 1873-6513 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32640278/Stress_and_Perception_of_Procedural_Pain_Management_in_Chinese_Parents_of_Children_with_Cancer L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0885-3924(20)30571-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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