Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cytoskeletal organization in isolated plant cells under geometry control.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020 Jul 21; 117(29):17399-17408.PN

Abstract

The cytoskeleton plays a key role in establishing robust cell shape. In animals, it is well established that cell shape can also influence cytoskeletal organization. Cytoskeletal proteins are well conserved between animal and plant kingdoms; nevertheless, because plant cells exhibit major structural differences to animal cells, the question arises whether the plant cytoskeleton also responds to geometrical cues. Recent numerical simulations predicted that a geometry-based rule is sufficient to explain the microtubule (MT) organization observed in cells. Due to their high flexural rigidity and persistence length of the order of a few millimeters, MTs are rigid over cellular dimensions and are thus expected to align along their long axis if constrained in specific geometries. This hypothesis remains to be tested in cellulo Here, we explore the relative contribution of geometry to the final organization of actin and MT cytoskeletons in single plant cells of Arabidopsis thaliana We show that the cytoskeleton aligns with the long axis of the cells. We find that actin organization relies on MTs but not the opposite. We develop a model of self-organizing MTs in three dimensions, which predicts the importance of MT severing, which we confirm experimentally. This work is a first step toward assessing quantitatively how cellular geometry contributes to the control of cytoskeletal organization in living plant cells.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1LR, United Kingdom.The Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1LR, United Kingdom.Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125; meyerow@caltech.edu henrik.jonsson@slcu.cam.ac.uk. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125.The Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1LR, United Kingdom; meyerow@caltech.edu henrik.jonsson@slcu.cam.ac.uk. Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA, United Kingdom. Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Computational Biology and Biological Physics, Lund University, 221 00 Lund, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32641513

Citation

Durand-Smet, Pauline, et al. "Cytoskeletal Organization in Isolated Plant Cells Under Geometry Control." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 117, no. 29, 2020, pp. 17399-17408.
Durand-Smet P, Spelman TA, Meyerowitz EM, et al. Cytoskeletal organization in isolated plant cells under geometry control. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2020;117(29):17399-17408.
Durand-Smet, P., Spelman, T. A., Meyerowitz, E. M., & Jönsson, H. (2020). Cytoskeletal organization in isolated plant cells under geometry control. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 117(29), 17399-17408. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2003184117
Durand-Smet P, et al. Cytoskeletal Organization in Isolated Plant Cells Under Geometry Control. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2020 Jul 21;117(29):17399-17408. PubMed PMID: 32641513.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cytoskeletal organization in isolated plant cells under geometry control. AU - Durand-Smet,Pauline, AU - Spelman,Tamsin A, AU - Meyerowitz,Elliot M, AU - Jönsson,Henrik, Y1 - 2020/07/08/ PY - 2020/7/10/pubmed PY - 2020/7/10/medline PY - 2020/7/10/entrez KW - actin KW - cell geometry KW - cytoskeleton KW - microtubules KW - plant cells SP - 17399 EP - 17408 JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America JO - Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. VL - 117 IS - 29 N2 - The cytoskeleton plays a key role in establishing robust cell shape. In animals, it is well established that cell shape can also influence cytoskeletal organization. Cytoskeletal proteins are well conserved between animal and plant kingdoms; nevertheless, because plant cells exhibit major structural differences to animal cells, the question arises whether the plant cytoskeleton also responds to geometrical cues. Recent numerical simulations predicted that a geometry-based rule is sufficient to explain the microtubule (MT) organization observed in cells. Due to their high flexural rigidity and persistence length of the order of a few millimeters, MTs are rigid over cellular dimensions and are thus expected to align along their long axis if constrained in specific geometries. This hypothesis remains to be tested in cellulo Here, we explore the relative contribution of geometry to the final organization of actin and MT cytoskeletons in single plant cells of Arabidopsis thaliana We show that the cytoskeleton aligns with the long axis of the cells. We find that actin organization relies on MTs but not the opposite. We develop a model of self-organizing MTs in three dimensions, which predicts the importance of MT severing, which we confirm experimentally. This work is a first step toward assessing quantitatively how cellular geometry contributes to the control of cytoskeletal organization in living plant cells. SN - 1091-6490 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32641513/Cytoskeletal_organization_in_isolated_plant_cells_under_geometry_control L2 - http://www.pnas.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=32641513 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.