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Syphilis Ocular Manifestations

Abstract
Syphilis was initially called the "French disease" by the people of Naples as they claimed that the disease was spread by French troops during the French invasion in the late 15th century. The disease acquired its current name, syphilis, from the title character of a poem written by Italian physician and poet Girolamo Fracastoro, describing the havoc of the disease in his country in 1530.[1] The disease is most commonly transmitted sexually, and its clinical course is divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary syphilis. Transplacental spread leads to congenital syphilis. Ocular manifestations can occur at any stage of the disease with varied clinical presentations because of which the disease is also known as the great imitator, as it can mimic a number of ocular diseases. Syphilis can involve almost any ocular structure, but posterior uveitis and panuveitis are the most common presentations. Other common manifestations include interstitial keratitis, recurrent anterior uveitis, retinal vasculitis, and optic neuropathy.[2] Ocular syphilis, if untreated, may lead to blindness. Ocular manifestations can be associated with neurosyphilis. Diagnosis is based on clinical exam with serological tests. The disease can be treated effectively with appropriate antibiotic therapy.

Publisher

StatPearls Publishing
Treasure Island (FL)

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32644383

Citation

Koundanya VV, Tripathy K: Syphilis Ocular Manifestations. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing, 2020, Treasure Island (FL).
Koundanya VV, Tripathy K. Syphilis Ocular Manifestations. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
Koundanya VV & Tripathy K. (2020). Syphilis Ocular Manifestations. In StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing
Koundanya VV, Tripathy K. Syphilis Ocular Manifestations. StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - CHAP T1 - Syphilis Ocular Manifestations BT - StatPearls A1 - Koundanya,Vikram V., AU - Tripathy,Koushik, Y1 - 2020/01// PY - 2020/7/10/pubmed PY - 2020/7/10/medline PY - 2020/7/10/entrez N2 - Syphilis was initially called the "French disease" by the people of Naples as they claimed that the disease was spread by French troops during the French invasion in the late 15th century. The disease acquired its current name, syphilis, from the title character of a poem written by Italian physician and poet Girolamo Fracastoro, describing the havoc of the disease in his country in 1530.[1] The disease is most commonly transmitted sexually, and its clinical course is divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary syphilis. Transplacental spread leads to congenital syphilis. Ocular manifestations can occur at any stage of the disease with varied clinical presentations because of which the disease is also known as the great imitator, as it can mimic a number of ocular diseases. Syphilis can involve almost any ocular structure, but posterior uveitis and panuveitis are the most common presentations. Other common manifestations include interstitial keratitis, recurrent anterior uveitis, retinal vasculitis, and optic neuropathy.[2] Ocular syphilis, if untreated, may lead to blindness. Ocular manifestations can be associated with neurosyphilis. Diagnosis is based on clinical exam with serological tests. The disease can be treated effectively with appropriate antibiotic therapy. PB - StatPearls Publishing CY - Treasure Island (FL) UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32644383/StatPearls:_Syphilis_Ocular_Manifestations L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK558957 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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