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Marcus Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome

Abstract
Marcus Gunn jaw-winking syndrome (MGJWS) is noted in congenital blepharoptosis. MGJWS was first described by a Scottish ophthalmologist Dr.Robert Marcus Gunn in the year 1883. This syndrome was initially reported in a 15-year-old girl as unilateral ptosis associated with the upper eyelid contraction on the same side.[1] Other names of MGJWS include Marcus-Gunn jaw winking phenomenon (MGP), Marcus Gunn ptosis, Marcus Gunn jaw winking trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis, Maxillopalpebral synkinesis, and Pterygoid-levator synkinesis. It is one of the congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD), and these individuals have variable degrees of blepharoptosis in the resting, primary position.[2] It is associated with synkinetic movements of the upper eyelid during masticating movements of the jaw. It is usually unilateral but may present bilaterally also.[3][4]

Publisher

StatPearls Publishing
Treasure Island (FL)

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32644484

Citation

Senthilkumar VA, Tripathy K: Marcus Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing, 2020, Treasure Island (FL).
Senthilkumar VA, Tripathy K. Marcus Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
Senthilkumar VA & Tripathy K. (2020). Marcus Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome. In StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing
Senthilkumar VA, Tripathy K. Marcus Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome. StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - CHAP T1 - Marcus Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome BT - StatPearls A1 - Senthilkumar,Vijayalakshmi A., AU - Tripathy,Koushik, Y1 - 2020/01// PY - 2020/7/10/pubmed PY - 2020/7/10/medline PY - 2020/7/10/entrez N2 - Marcus Gunn jaw-winking syndrome (MGJWS) is noted in congenital blepharoptosis. MGJWS was first described by a Scottish ophthalmologist Dr.Robert Marcus Gunn in the year 1883. This syndrome was initially reported in a 15-year-old girl as unilateral ptosis associated with the upper eyelid contraction on the same side.[1] Other names of MGJWS include Marcus-Gunn jaw winking phenomenon (MGP), Marcus Gunn ptosis, Marcus Gunn jaw winking trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis, Maxillopalpebral synkinesis, and Pterygoid-levator synkinesis. It is one of the congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD), and these individuals have variable degrees of blepharoptosis in the resting, primary position.[2] It is associated with synkinetic movements of the upper eyelid during masticating movements of the jaw. It is usually unilateral but may present bilaterally also.[3][4] PB - StatPearls Publishing CY - Treasure Island (FL) UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32644484/StatPearls:_Marcus_Gunn_Jaw_Winking_Syndrome L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK559058 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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