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Fuchs Uveitis Syndrome

Abstract
Fuchs uveitis syndrome (FUS) is a chronic, typically unilateral mild anterior uveitis that was first described by Ernst Fuchs in 1906. FUS is also referred to as Fuchs heterochromic uveitis and Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis. The exact etiology of FUS is unknown. When first described, Fuchs had many theories about what caused this unique pathology; however, over the years, many of these have been largely disproven, with the infectious theory remaining as one of the more probable causes. The patient population demographics vary by geographic locations, with different rates of incidence, age of symptom presentation, and rates of complications depending on the subpopulation studied. Most patients with FUS experience changes in vision mainly due to secondary complications, such as cataract and glaucoma. Treatment of these complications leads to a good prognosis.[1][2][3][4] Non-hereditary heterochromia, present in about 13.9% of patients with FUS, is caused by anterior iris stromal atrophy.[4][5] The patient will notice a lightening in the affected eye. Heterochromia is predominantly seen in patients with a lighter colored iris.  Patients with a darker colored iris have more pigment cells in the anterior border layer of the iris, making the atrophy in the iris less apparent, thus will less commonly develop heterochromia.[3][4][6] This article will discuss the etiology, epidemiology, proposed pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of FUS and its complications.

Publisher

StatPearls Publishing
Treasure Island (FL)

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32644574

Citation

Moshirfar M, Villarreal A, Ronquillo Y: Fuchs Uveitis Syndrome. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing, 2020, Treasure Island (FL).
Moshirfar M, Villarreal A, Ronquillo Y. Fuchs Uveitis Syndrome. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
Moshirfar M & Villarreal A & Ronquillo Y. (2020). Fuchs Uveitis Syndrome. In StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing
Moshirfar M, Villarreal A, Ronquillo Y. Fuchs Uveitis Syndrome. StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - CHAP T1 - Fuchs Uveitis Syndrome BT - StatPearls A1 - Moshirfar,Majid, AU - Villarreal,Alex, AU - Ronquillo,Yasmyne, Y1 - 2020/01// PY - 2020/7/10/pubmed PY - 2020/7/10/medline PY - 2020/7/10/entrez N2 - Fuchs uveitis syndrome (FUS) is a chronic, typically unilateral mild anterior uveitis that was first described by Ernst Fuchs in 1906. FUS is also referred to as Fuchs heterochromic uveitis and Fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis. The exact etiology of FUS is unknown. When first described, Fuchs had many theories about what caused this unique pathology; however, over the years, many of these have been largely disproven, with the infectious theory remaining as one of the more probable causes. The patient population demographics vary by geographic locations, with different rates of incidence, age of symptom presentation, and rates of complications depending on the subpopulation studied. Most patients with FUS experience changes in vision mainly due to secondary complications, such as cataract and glaucoma. Treatment of these complications leads to a good prognosis.[1][2][3][4] Non-hereditary heterochromia, present in about 13.9% of patients with FUS, is caused by anterior iris stromal atrophy.[4][5] The patient will notice a lightening in the affected eye. Heterochromia is predominantly seen in patients with a lighter colored iris.  Patients with a darker colored iris have more pigment cells in the anterior border layer of the iris, making the atrophy in the iris less apparent, thus will less commonly develop heterochromia.[3][4][6] This article will discuss the etiology, epidemiology, proposed pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of FUS and its complications. PB - StatPearls Publishing CY - Treasure Island (FL) UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32644574/StatPearls:_Fuchs_Uveitis_Syndrome L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK559148 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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