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Herpes Simplex Ophthalmicus

Abstract
Herpes simplex ophthalmicus (HSO) is caused by the neurotropic herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 and affects all the structures of the eye. Primary infection occurs in the form of blepharoconjunctivitis both in neonate through birth canal transmission and in children through orofacial mucus membrane transmission. Primary infection is often self-limiting, and the virus ascends through the cutaneous nerves and stays latent in the trigeminal nerve ganglion. Upon reactivation due to unfavorable immune conditions, a secondary infection happens involving eyelids, conjunctiva, cornea, uvea, and rarely retina. Antiviral agents, both topical and systemic antivirals, are the treatment of choice. Severe infections and its sequelae can often cause severe impairment to the vision. Once infected, it is impossible to eradicate the virus from the body.[1]

Publisher

StatPearls Publishing
Treasure Island (FL)

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32644620

Citation

Kanukollu VM, Patel BC: Herpes Simplex Ophthalmicus. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing, 2020, Treasure Island (FL).
Kanukollu VM, Patel BC. Herpes Simplex Ophthalmicus. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
Kanukollu VM & Patel BC. (2020). Herpes Simplex Ophthalmicus. In StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing
Kanukollu VM, Patel BC. Herpes Simplex Ophthalmicus. StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - CHAP T1 - Herpes Simplex Ophthalmicus BT - StatPearls A1 - Kanukollu,Venkata M., AU - Patel,Bhupendra C., Y1 - 2020/01// PY - 2020/7/10/pubmed PY - 2020/7/10/medline PY - 2020/7/10/entrez N2 - Herpes simplex ophthalmicus (HSO) is caused by the neurotropic herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 and affects all the structures of the eye. Primary infection occurs in the form of blepharoconjunctivitis both in neonate through birth canal transmission and in children through orofacial mucus membrane transmission. Primary infection is often self-limiting, and the virus ascends through the cutaneous nerves and stays latent in the trigeminal nerve ganglion. Upon reactivation due to unfavorable immune conditions, a secondary infection happens involving eyelids, conjunctiva, cornea, uvea, and rarely retina. Antiviral agents, both topical and systemic antivirals, are the treatment of choice. Severe infections and its sequelae can often cause severe impairment to the vision. Once infected, it is impossible to eradicate the virus from the body.[1] PB - StatPearls Publishing CY - Treasure Island (FL) UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32644620/StatPearls:_Herpes_Simplex_Ophthalmicus_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK559194 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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