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Esophageal Manometry

Abstract
The esophagus is a muscular tube that begins at the hypopharynx and ends at the stomach. The primary role of the esophagus is to transfer solids and liquids into the stomach. There is intricate coordination of esophageal striated and smooth muscles allowing food bolus propagation. Problems arise when patients have difficulty swallowing or reflux of gastric contents. When abnormalities of the esophagus are suspected, tests can be utilized to examine the esophagus, including upper gastrointestinal (GI) swallow study, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), pH monitoring, and esophageal manometry. We will focus specifically on esophageal manometry in this article. Esophageal manometry is the evaluation of the movement and pressure of the esophagus. Conventional esophageal manometry used probes at every 5 cm in the esophagus to measure contraction and pressure.[1] This was first utilized in the 1950s[1] and had been the gold standard for diagnosing esophageal motility disorders. Recently, this technology was advanced and conventional esophageal manometry was replaced by high-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) as the gold standard. HRM uses a high-resolution catheter to transmit intraluminal pressure data that are subsequently converted into dynamic esophageal pressure topography (EPT) plots.[2] These transducer probes are located approximately every 1 cm in the esophagus on the catheter. After the catheter is placed in the esophagus, patients get a baseline measurement and then do 10 wet swallows. From this data, a motility diagnosis can be made according to the Chicago Classification (version 3.0).[3] Based on the diagnosis, different treatments can be perused.

Publisher

StatPearls Publishing
Treasure Island (FL)

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32644663

Citation

Baldwin D, Puckett Y: Esophageal Manometry. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing, 2020, Treasure Island (FL).
Baldwin D, Puckett Y. Esophageal Manometry. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
Baldwin D & Puckett Y. (2020). Esophageal Manometry. In StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing
Baldwin D, Puckett Y. Esophageal Manometry. StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - CHAP T1 - Esophageal Manometry BT - StatPearls A1 - Baldwin,Dustin, AU - Puckett,Yana, Y1 - 2020/01// PY - 2020/7/10/pubmed PY - 2020/7/10/medline PY - 2020/7/10/entrez N2 - The esophagus is a muscular tube that begins at the hypopharynx and ends at the stomach. The primary role of the esophagus is to transfer solids and liquids into the stomach. There is intricate coordination of esophageal striated and smooth muscles allowing food bolus propagation. Problems arise when patients have difficulty swallowing or reflux of gastric contents. When abnormalities of the esophagus are suspected, tests can be utilized to examine the esophagus, including upper gastrointestinal (GI) swallow study, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), pH monitoring, and esophageal manometry. We will focus specifically on esophageal manometry in this article. Esophageal manometry is the evaluation of the movement and pressure of the esophagus. Conventional esophageal manometry used probes at every 5 cm in the esophagus to measure contraction and pressure.[1] This was first utilized in the 1950s[1] and had been the gold standard for diagnosing esophageal motility disorders. Recently, this technology was advanced and conventional esophageal manometry was replaced by high-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) as the gold standard. HRM uses a high-resolution catheter to transmit intraluminal pressure data that are subsequently converted into dynamic esophageal pressure topography (EPT) plots.[2] These transducer probes are located approximately every 1 cm in the esophagus on the catheter. After the catheter is placed in the esophagus, patients get a baseline measurement and then do 10 wet swallows. From this data, a motility diagnosis can be made according to the Chicago Classification (version 3.0).[3] Based on the diagnosis, different treatments can be perused. PB - StatPearls Publishing CY - Treasure Island (FL) UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32644663/StatPearls:_Esophageal_Manometry L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK559237 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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