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Acute neonatal Listeria monocytogenes infection causes long-term, organ-specific changes in immune cell subset composition.
Eur J Microbiol Immunol (Bp). 2020 Jun 19 [Online ahead of print]EJ

Abstract

Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a food-borne pathogen with a high chance of infecting neonates, pregnant women, elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Lm infection in neonates can cause neonatal meningitis and sepsis with a high risk of severe neurological and developmental sequelae and high mortality rates. However, whether an acute neonatal Lm infection causes long-term effects on the immune system persisting until adulthood has not been fully elucidated. Here, we established a neonatal Lm infection model and monitored the composition of major immune cell subsets at defined time points post infection (p.i.) in secondary lymphoid organs and the intestine. Twelve weeks p.i., the CD8+ T cell population was decreased in colon and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs) with an opposing increase in the spleen. In the colon, we observed an accumulation of CD4+ and CD8+ effector/memory T cells with an increase of T-bet+ T helper 1 (Th1) cells. In addition, 12 weeks p.i. an altered composition of innate lymphoid cell (ILC) and dendritic cell (DC) subsets was still observed in colon and mLNs, respectively. Together, these findings highlight organ-specific long-term consequences of an acute neonatal Lm infection on both the adaptive and innate immune system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department Experimental Immunology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.1Department Experimental Immunology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.1Department Experimental Immunology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.1Department Experimental Immunology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany. 2Cluster of Excellence RESIST (EXC 2155), Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32644940

Citation

Zou, Mangge, et al. "Acute Neonatal Listeria Monocytogenes Infection Causes Long-term, Organ-specific Changes in Immune Cell Subset Composition." European Journal of Microbiology & Immunology, 2020.
Zou M, Yang J, Wiechers C, et al. Acute neonatal Listeria monocytogenes infection causes long-term, organ-specific changes in immune cell subset composition. Eur J Microbiol Immunol (Bp). 2020.
Zou, M., Yang, J., Wiechers, C., & Huehn, J. (2020). Acute neonatal Listeria monocytogenes infection causes long-term, organ-specific changes in immune cell subset composition. European Journal of Microbiology & Immunology. https://doi.org/10.1556/1886.2020.00007
Zou M, et al. Acute Neonatal Listeria Monocytogenes Infection Causes Long-term, Organ-specific Changes in Immune Cell Subset Composition. Eur J Microbiol Immunol (Bp). 2020 Jun 19; PubMed PMID: 32644940.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute neonatal Listeria monocytogenes infection causes long-term, organ-specific changes in immune cell subset composition. AU - Zou,Mangge, AU - Yang,Juhao, AU - Wiechers,Carolin, AU - Huehn,Jochen, Y1 - 2020/06/19/ PY - 2020/03/20/received PY - 2020/04/16/accepted PY - 2020/7/10/entrez PY - 2020/7/10/pubmed PY - 2020/7/10/medline KW - immune system KW - listeria monocytogenes KW - long-term consequences KW - neonatal infection KW - organ-specific JF - European journal of microbiology & immunology JO - Eur J Microbiol Immunol (Bp) N2 - Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a food-borne pathogen with a high chance of infecting neonates, pregnant women, elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Lm infection in neonates can cause neonatal meningitis and sepsis with a high risk of severe neurological and developmental sequelae and high mortality rates. However, whether an acute neonatal Lm infection causes long-term effects on the immune system persisting until adulthood has not been fully elucidated. Here, we established a neonatal Lm infection model and monitored the composition of major immune cell subsets at defined time points post infection (p.i.) in secondary lymphoid organs and the intestine. Twelve weeks p.i., the CD8+ T cell population was decreased in colon and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs) with an opposing increase in the spleen. In the colon, we observed an accumulation of CD4+ and CD8+ effector/memory T cells with an increase of T-bet+ T helper 1 (Th1) cells. In addition, 12 weeks p.i. an altered composition of innate lymphoid cell (ILC) and dendritic cell (DC) subsets was still observed in colon and mLNs, respectively. Together, these findings highlight organ-specific long-term consequences of an acute neonatal Lm infection on both the adaptive and innate immune system. SN - 2062-509X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32644940/Acute_neonatal_Listeria_monocytogenes_infection_causes_long-term,_organ-specific_changes_in_immune_cell_subset_composition DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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