Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Feasibility of Tablet-Based Patient-Reported Symptom Data Collection Among Hemodialysis Patients.
Kidney Int Rep. 2020 Jul; 5(7):1026-1039.KI

Abstract

Introduction

Individuals receiving in-center hemodialysis have high symptom burdens but often do not report their symptoms to care teams. Evidence from other diseases suggest that use of symptom electronic patient-reported outcome measures (ePROMs) may improve outcomes. We assessed the usability of a symptom ePROM system and then implemented a quality improvement (QI) project with the objective of improving symptom communication at a US hemodialysis clinic. During the project, we assessed the feasibility of ePROM implementation and conducted a substudy exploring the effect of ePROM use on patient-centered care.

Methods

After conducting usability testing, we used mixed methods, guided by the Quality Implementation Framework, to implement a 16-week symptom ePROM QI project. We performed pre-, intra-, and postproject stakeholder interviews to identify implementation barriers and facilitators. We collected ePROM system-generated data on symptoms, e-mail alerts, and response rates, among other factors, to inform our feasibility assessment. We compared pre- and postproject outcomes.

Results

There were 62 patient participants (34% black, 16% Spanish-speaking) and 19 care team participants (4 physicians, 15 clinic personnel) at QI project start, and 32 research participants. In total, the symptom ePROM was administered 496 times (completion rate = 84%). The implementation approach and ePROM system were modified to address stakeholder-identified concerns throughout. ePROM implementation was feasible as demonstrated by the program's acceptability, demand, implementation success, practicality, integration in care, and observed trend toward improved outcomes.

Conclusions

Symptom ePROM administration during hemodialysis is feasible. Trials investigating the effectiveness of symptom ePROMs and optimal administration strategies are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of North Carolina Kidney Center, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.University of North Carolina Kidney Center, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.University of North Carolina Kidney Center, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.University of North Carolina Kidney Center, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.University of North Carolina Kidney Center, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32647760

Citation

Flythe, Jennifer E., et al. "Feasibility of Tablet-Based Patient-Reported Symptom Data Collection Among Hemodialysis Patients." Kidney International Reports, vol. 5, no. 7, 2020, pp. 1026-1039.
Flythe JE, Tugman MJ, Narendra JH, et al. Feasibility of Tablet-Based Patient-Reported Symptom Data Collection Among Hemodialysis Patients. Kidney Int Rep. 2020;5(7):1026-1039.
Flythe, J. E., Tugman, M. J., Narendra, J. H., Dorough, A., Hilbert, J., Assimon, M. M., & DeWalt, D. A. (2020). Feasibility of Tablet-Based Patient-Reported Symptom Data Collection Among Hemodialysis Patients. Kidney International Reports, 5(7), 1026-1039. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ekir.2020.04.021
Flythe JE, et al. Feasibility of Tablet-Based Patient-Reported Symptom Data Collection Among Hemodialysis Patients. Kidney Int Rep. 2020;5(7):1026-1039. PubMed PMID: 32647760.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Feasibility of Tablet-Based Patient-Reported Symptom Data Collection Among Hemodialysis Patients. AU - Flythe,Jennifer E, AU - Tugman,Matthew J, AU - Narendra,Julia H, AU - Dorough,Adeline, AU - Hilbert,Johnathan, AU - Assimon,Magdalene M, AU - DeWalt,Darren A, Y1 - 2020/04/29/ PY - 2020/01/05/received PY - 2020/03/22/revised PY - 2020/04/20/accepted PY - 2020/7/11/entrez PY - 2020/7/11/pubmed PY - 2020/7/11/medline KW - hemodialysis KW - implementation KW - improvement KW - mixed methods KW - patient-reported outcomes KW - quality KW - symptoms SP - 1026 EP - 1039 JF - Kidney international reports JO - Kidney Int Rep VL - 5 IS - 7 N2 - Introduction: Individuals receiving in-center hemodialysis have high symptom burdens but often do not report their symptoms to care teams. Evidence from other diseases suggest that use of symptom electronic patient-reported outcome measures (ePROMs) may improve outcomes. We assessed the usability of a symptom ePROM system and then implemented a quality improvement (QI) project with the objective of improving symptom communication at a US hemodialysis clinic. During the project, we assessed the feasibility of ePROM implementation and conducted a substudy exploring the effect of ePROM use on patient-centered care. Methods: After conducting usability testing, we used mixed methods, guided by the Quality Implementation Framework, to implement a 16-week symptom ePROM QI project. We performed pre-, intra-, and postproject stakeholder interviews to identify implementation barriers and facilitators. We collected ePROM system-generated data on symptoms, e-mail alerts, and response rates, among other factors, to inform our feasibility assessment. We compared pre- and postproject outcomes. Results: There were 62 patient participants (34% black, 16% Spanish-speaking) and 19 care team participants (4 physicians, 15 clinic personnel) at QI project start, and 32 research participants. In total, the symptom ePROM was administered 496 times (completion rate = 84%). The implementation approach and ePROM system were modified to address stakeholder-identified concerns throughout. ePROM implementation was feasible as demonstrated by the program's acceptability, demand, implementation success, practicality, integration in care, and observed trend toward improved outcomes. Conclusions: Symptom ePROM administration during hemodialysis is feasible. Trials investigating the effectiveness of symptom ePROMs and optimal administration strategies are needed. SN - 2468-0249 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32647760/Feasibility_of_Tablet-Based_Patient-Reported_Symptom_Data_Collection_Among_Hemodialysis_Patients DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.