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Epidemiologic treatment of contacts to Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis infection in STD clinic patients in Seattle, WA 1994-2018.
Sex Transm Dis. 2020 Jul 06 [Online ahead of print]ST

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines recommend that clinicians empirically treat the sex partners of persons with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) or Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection before confirming that they are infected. It is possible that this practice, known as epidemiological treatment, results in overtreatment of uninfected persons and may contribute to development of antimicrobial resistance. We sought to quantify the number of patients who received epidemiologic treatment and the proportion overtreated.

METHODS

We reviewed records from a municipal STD clinic in Seattle, WA from 1994 - 2018 to identify visits by asymptomatic patients seeking care because of sexual contact to a partner with GC and/or CT. We defined overtreatment as receipt of antibiotic(s) in the absence of a positive GC/CT test and calculated the proportions of contacts epidemiologically treated, tested, positive for GC/CT, and overtreated in five 5-year periods stratified by sex and gender of sex partner. We used the Cochran-Armitage test to assess for temporal trends.

RESULTS

The number of asymptomatic contacts epidemiologically treated for GC/CT increased from 949 to 3,159 between the 1994-1998 and 2014-2018 periods. In 2014-2018, 55% of persons were overtreated, the majority of these were MSM (82.1%). The proportion of MSM overtreated decreased from 74% to 65% (p<0.01) but the total number of overtreated MSM increased from 172 to 1,428.

DISCUSSION

A high proportion of persons receiving epidemiologic treatment for GC/ CT are uninfected. The current practice of routinely treating all sex partners of persons with GC/CT merits reconsideration in light of growing antimicrobial resistance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Public Health - Seattle & King County, HIV/STD Program, Seattle, WA.Public Health - Seattle & King County, HIV/STD Program, Seattle, WA.Public Health - Seattle & King County, HIV/STD Program, Seattle, WA.Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Public Health - Seattle & King County, HIV/STD Program, Seattle, WA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32649579

Citation

Rowlinson, Emily, et al. "Epidemiologic Treatment of Contacts to Neisseria Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection in STD Clinic Patients in Seattle, WA 1994-2018." Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2020.
Rowlinson E, Golden MR, Berzkalns A, et al. Epidemiologic treatment of contacts to Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis infection in STD clinic patients in Seattle, WA 1994-2018. Sex Transm Dis. 2020.
Rowlinson, E., Golden, M. R., Berzkalns, A., Thibault, C., & Barbee, L. A. (2020). Epidemiologic treatment of contacts to Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis infection in STD clinic patients in Seattle, WA 1994-2018. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. https://doi.org/10.1097/OLQ.0000000000001234
Rowlinson E, et al. Epidemiologic Treatment of Contacts to Neisseria Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection in STD Clinic Patients in Seattle, WA 1994-2018. Sex Transm Dis. 2020 Jul 6; PubMed PMID: 32649579.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiologic treatment of contacts to Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis infection in STD clinic patients in Seattle, WA 1994-2018. AU - Rowlinson,Emily, AU - Golden,Matthew R, AU - Berzkalns,Anna, AU - Thibault,Christina, AU - Barbee,Lindley A, Y1 - 2020/07/06/ PY - 2020/7/11/entrez PY - 2020/7/11/pubmed PY - 2020/7/11/medline JF - Sexually transmitted diseases JO - Sex Transm Dis N2 - INTRODUCTION: Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines recommend that clinicians empirically treat the sex partners of persons with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) or Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection before confirming that they are infected. It is possible that this practice, known as epidemiological treatment, results in overtreatment of uninfected persons and may contribute to development of antimicrobial resistance. We sought to quantify the number of patients who received epidemiologic treatment and the proportion overtreated. METHODS: We reviewed records from a municipal STD clinic in Seattle, WA from 1994 - 2018 to identify visits by asymptomatic patients seeking care because of sexual contact to a partner with GC and/or CT. We defined overtreatment as receipt of antibiotic(s) in the absence of a positive GC/CT test and calculated the proportions of contacts epidemiologically treated, tested, positive for GC/CT, and overtreated in five 5-year periods stratified by sex and gender of sex partner. We used the Cochran-Armitage test to assess for temporal trends. RESULTS: The number of asymptomatic contacts epidemiologically treated for GC/CT increased from 949 to 3,159 between the 1994-1998 and 2014-2018 periods. In 2014-2018, 55% of persons were overtreated, the majority of these were MSM (82.1%). The proportion of MSM overtreated decreased from 74% to 65% (p<0.01) but the total number of overtreated MSM increased from 172 to 1,428. DISCUSSION: A high proportion of persons receiving epidemiologic treatment for GC/ CT are uninfected. The current practice of routinely treating all sex partners of persons with GC/CT merits reconsideration in light of growing antimicrobial resistance. SN - 1537-4521 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32649579/Epidemiologic_treatment_of_contacts_to_Neisseria_gonorrhea_and_Chlamydia_trachomatis_infection_in_STD_clinic_patients_in_Seattle,_WA_1994-2018 L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/OLQ.0000000000001234 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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