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The Relationship between Protein Intake and Source on Factors Associated with Glycemic Control in Individuals with Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes.
Nutrients. 2020 Jul 08; 12(7)N

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality largely due to increased cardiovascular disease risk. This study examined the relationships among protein consumption and sources on glycemic control and cardiovascular health in individuals with prediabetes and T2D. Sixty-two overweight or obese participants with prediabetes or T2D, aged 45-75 years were stratified into the following three groups based on protein intake: <0.8 g (gram)/kg (kilogram) body weight (bw), ≥0.8 but <1.0 g/kg bw, and ≥1.0 g/kg bw as below, meeting, and above the recommended levels of protein intake, respectively. Body mass, body mass index (BMI), hip circumference (HC), waist circumference (WC), lean mass, and fat mass (FM) were significantly higher in participants who consumed below the recommended level of protein intake as compared with other groups. Higher animal protein intake was associated with greater insulin secretion and lower triglycerides (TG). Total, low-density, and high-density cholesterol were significantly higher in participants who met the recommended protein intake as compared with the other groups. These data suggest that high protein consumption is associated with lower BMI, HC, WC, and FM, and can improve insulin resistance without affecting lipid profiles in this population. Furthermore, higher intake of animal protein can improve β-cell function and lower plasma TG.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA.Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80526, USA.Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Division of Animal and Nutritional Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA.Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Department of Nutrition, Life University, Marietta, GA 30060, USA.Department of Biomedical Sciences and Program in Neuroscience, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Institute for Successful Longevity, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Center for Advancing Exercise and Nutrition Research on Aging, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA. Institute for Successful Longevity, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32650580

Citation

Akhavan, Neda S., et al. "The Relationship Between Protein Intake and Source On Factors Associated With Glycemic Control in Individuals With Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes." Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 7, 2020.
Akhavan NS, Pourafshar S, Johnson SA, et al. The Relationship between Protein Intake and Source on Factors Associated with Glycemic Control in Individuals with Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Nutrients. 2020;12(7).
Akhavan, N. S., Pourafshar, S., Johnson, S. A., Foley, E. M., George, K. S., Munoz, J., Siebert, S., Clark, E. A., Basiri, R., Hickner, R. C., Navaei, N., Levenson, C. W., Panton, L. B., Daggy, B. P., & Arjmandi, B. H. (2020). The Relationship between Protein Intake and Source on Factors Associated with Glycemic Control in Individuals with Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Nutrients, 12(7). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072031
Akhavan NS, et al. The Relationship Between Protein Intake and Source On Factors Associated With Glycemic Control in Individuals With Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Nutrients. 2020 Jul 8;12(7) PubMed PMID: 32650580.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Relationship between Protein Intake and Source on Factors Associated with Glycemic Control in Individuals with Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. AU - Akhavan,Neda S, AU - Pourafshar,Shirin, AU - Johnson,Sarah A, AU - Foley,Elizabeth M, AU - George,Kelli S, AU - Munoz,Joseph, AU - Siebert,Shalom, AU - Clark,Elizabeth A, AU - Basiri,Raedeh, AU - Hickner,Robert C, AU - Navaei,Negin, AU - Levenson,Cathy W, AU - Panton,Lynn B, AU - Daggy,Bruce P, AU - Arjmandi,Bahram H, Y1 - 2020/07/08/ PY - 2020/06/06/received PY - 2020/06/23/revised PY - 2020/07/03/accepted PY - 2020/7/12/entrez PY - 2020/7/12/pubmed PY - 2020/7/12/medline KW - RDA KW - cardiovascular risk factors KW - diabetes KW - metabolic syndrome KW - protein source JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 12 IS - 7 N2 - Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality largely due to increased cardiovascular disease risk. This study examined the relationships among protein consumption and sources on glycemic control and cardiovascular health in individuals with prediabetes and T2D. Sixty-two overweight or obese participants with prediabetes or T2D, aged 45-75 years were stratified into the following three groups based on protein intake: <0.8 g (gram)/kg (kilogram) body weight (bw), ≥0.8 but <1.0 g/kg bw, and ≥1.0 g/kg bw as below, meeting, and above the recommended levels of protein intake, respectively. Body mass, body mass index (BMI), hip circumference (HC), waist circumference (WC), lean mass, and fat mass (FM) were significantly higher in participants who consumed below the recommended level of protein intake as compared with other groups. Higher animal protein intake was associated with greater insulin secretion and lower triglycerides (TG). Total, low-density, and high-density cholesterol were significantly higher in participants who met the recommended protein intake as compared with the other groups. These data suggest that high protein consumption is associated with lower BMI, HC, WC, and FM, and can improve insulin resistance without affecting lipid profiles in this population. Furthermore, higher intake of animal protein can improve β-cell function and lower plasma TG. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32650580/The_Relationship_between_Protein_Intake_and_Source_on_Factors_Associated_with_Glycemic_Control_in_Individuals_with_Prediabetes_and_Type_2_Diabetes L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu12072031 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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