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Preeclampsia in pregnancy affecting the stemness and differentiation potency of haematopoietic stem cell of the umbilical cord blood.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2020 Jul 10; 20(1):399.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been proposed as the potential source of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for allogeneic transplantation. However, few studies have shown that a common disease in pregnancy such as preeclampsia would affect the quality of UCB-HSC. Total nucleated cell count (TNC) is an important parameter that can be used to predict engraftment including UCB banking. Colony forming unit (CFU) assay is widely used as an indicator to predict the success of engraftment, since direct quantitative assay for HSC proliferation is unavailable. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of preeclampsia in pregnancy on the stemness and differentiation potency of UCB-HSC.

METHODS

Mononuclear cells (MNC) were isolated from UCB and further enriched for CD34+ cells using immune-magnetic method followed by CFU assay. A panel of HSC markers including differentiated haematopoietic markers were used to confirm the differentiation ability of UCB-HSC by flow cytometry analysis.

RESULTS/ DISCUSSION

The HSC progenitor's colonies from the preeclampsia group were significantly lower compared to the control. This correlates with the low UCB volume, TNC and CD34+ cells count. In addition, the UCB-enriched CD34+ population were lymphoid progenitors and capable to differentiate into natural killer cells and T-lymphocytes.

CONCLUSION

These findings should be taken into consideration when selecting UCB from preeclamptic mothers for banking and predicting successful treatment related to UCB transplant.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (CTERM), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC), 12th Floor, Clinical Block, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. nordinf@ppukm.ukm.edu.my.Cell Therapy Centre (CTC), UKMMC, 12th Floor, Clinical Block, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, UKMMC, Clinical Block, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Cell Therapy Centre (CTC), UKMMC, 12th Floor, Clinical Block, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32650736

Citation

Nordin, Fazlina, et al. "Preeclampsia in Pregnancy Affecting the Stemness and Differentiation Potency of Haematopoietic Stem Cell of the Umbilical Cord Blood." BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, vol. 20, no. 1, 2020, p. 399.
Nordin F, Idris MRM, Mahdy ZA, et al. Preeclampsia in pregnancy affecting the stemness and differentiation potency of haematopoietic stem cell of the umbilical cord blood. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2020;20(1):399.
Nordin, F., Idris, M. R. M., Mahdy, Z. A., & Wahid, S. F. A. (2020). Preeclampsia in pregnancy affecting the stemness and differentiation potency of haematopoietic stem cell of the umbilical cord blood. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 20(1), 399. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-020-03084-7
Nordin F, et al. Preeclampsia in Pregnancy Affecting the Stemness and Differentiation Potency of Haematopoietic Stem Cell of the Umbilical Cord Blood. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2020 Jul 10;20(1):399. PubMed PMID: 32650736.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preeclampsia in pregnancy affecting the stemness and differentiation potency of haematopoietic stem cell of the umbilical cord blood. AU - Nordin,Fazlina, AU - Idris,Mohd Razif Mohd, AU - Mahdy,Zaleha Abdullah, AU - Wahid,S Fadilah Abd, Y1 - 2020/07/10/ PY - 2019/12/03/received PY - 2020/07/01/accepted PY - 2020/7/12/entrez PY - 2020/7/12/pubmed PY - 2020/7/12/medline KW - Colony forming unit (CFU) KW - Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC), preeclampsia (PE), Total nucleated cell (TNC) KW - Umbilical cord blood (UCB) SP - 399 EP - 399 JF - BMC pregnancy and childbirth JO - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been proposed as the potential source of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for allogeneic transplantation. However, few studies have shown that a common disease in pregnancy such as preeclampsia would affect the quality of UCB-HSC. Total nucleated cell count (TNC) is an important parameter that can be used to predict engraftment including UCB banking. Colony forming unit (CFU) assay is widely used as an indicator to predict the success of engraftment, since direct quantitative assay for HSC proliferation is unavailable. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of preeclampsia in pregnancy on the stemness and differentiation potency of UCB-HSC. METHODS: Mononuclear cells (MNC) were isolated from UCB and further enriched for CD34+ cells using immune-magnetic method followed by CFU assay. A panel of HSC markers including differentiated haematopoietic markers were used to confirm the differentiation ability of UCB-HSC by flow cytometry analysis. RESULTS/ DISCUSSION: The HSC progenitor's colonies from the preeclampsia group were significantly lower compared to the control. This correlates with the low UCB volume, TNC and CD34+ cells count. In addition, the UCB-enriched CD34+ population were lymphoid progenitors and capable to differentiate into natural killer cells and T-lymphocytes. CONCLUSION: These findings should be taken into consideration when selecting UCB from preeclamptic mothers for banking and predicting successful treatment related to UCB transplant. SN - 1471-2393 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32650736/Preeclampsia_in_pregnancy_affecting_the_stemness_and_differentiation_potency_of_haematopoietic_stem_cell_of_the_umbilical_cord_blood L2 - https://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12884-020-03084-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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