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Chemical characteristics and sources of water-soluble organic aerosol in southwest suburb of Beijing.
J Environ Sci (China). 2020 Sep; 95:99-110.JE

Abstract

PM2.5 filter sampling and components measurement were conducted in autumn and winter from 2014 to 2015 at a suburban site (referred herein as "LLH site") located in the southwest of Beijing. The offline aerosol mass spectrometry (offline-AMS) analysis and positive matrix factorization (PMF) were applied for measurement and source apportionment of water-soluble organic aerosol (WSOA). Organic aerosol (OA) always dominated PM2.5 during the sampling period, especially in winter. WSOA pollution was serious during the polluted period both in autumn (31.1 µg/m3) and winter (31.9 µg/m3), while WSOA accounted for 54.4% of OA during the polluted period in autumn, much more than that (21.3%) in winter. The oxidation degree of WSOA at LLH site was at a high level (oxygen-to-carbon ratio, O/C=0.91) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) contributed more mass ratio of WSOA than primary organic aerosol (POA) during the whole observation period. In winter, coal combustion OA (CCOA) was a stable source of OA and on average accounted for 25.1% of WSOA. In autumn, biomass burning OA (BBOA) from household combustion contributed 38.3% of WSOA during polluted period. In addition to oxygenated OA (OOA), aqueous-oxygenated OA (aq-OOA) was identified as an important factor of SOA. During heavy pollution period, the mass proportion of aq-OOA to WSOA increased significantly, implying the significant SOA formation through aqueous-phase process. The result of this study highlights the concentration on controlling the residential coal and biomass burning, as well as the research needs on aqueous chemistry in OA formation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing 100084, China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing 100084, China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing 100084, China. Electronic address: shxwang@tsinghua.edu.cn.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing 100084, China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing 100084, China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing 100084, China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Department of Environmental Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China.Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen, Switzerland; Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research, University of Helsinki, Finland.Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen, Switzerland.Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen, Switzerland.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing 100084, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32653198

Citation

Hu, Ruolan, et al. "Chemical Characteristics and Sources of Water-soluble Organic Aerosol in Southwest Suburb of Beijing." Journal of Environmental Sciences (China), vol. 95, 2020, pp. 99-110.
Hu R, Xu Q, Wang S, et al. Chemical characteristics and sources of water-soluble organic aerosol in southwest suburb of Beijing. J Environ Sci (China). 2020;95:99-110.
Hu, R., Xu, Q., Wang, S., Hua, Y., Bhattarai, N., Jiang, J., Song, Y., Daellenbach, K. R., Qi, L., Prevot, A. S. H., & Hao, J. (2020). Chemical characteristics and sources of water-soluble organic aerosol in southwest suburb of Beijing. Journal of Environmental Sciences (China), 95, 99-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jes.2020.04.004
Hu R, et al. Chemical Characteristics and Sources of Water-soluble Organic Aerosol in Southwest Suburb of Beijing. J Environ Sci (China). 2020;95:99-110. PubMed PMID: 32653198.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chemical characteristics and sources of water-soluble organic aerosol in southwest suburb of Beijing. AU - Hu,Ruolan, AU - Xu,Qingcheng, AU - Wang,Shuxiao, AU - Hua,Yang, AU - Bhattarai,Noshan, AU - Jiang,Jingkun, AU - Song,Yu, AU - Daellenbach,Kaspar R, AU - Qi,Lu, AU - Prevot,Andre S H, AU - Hao,Jiming, Y1 - 2020/04/16/ PY - 2019/10/23/received PY - 2020/04/03/revised PY - 2020/04/03/accepted PY - 2020/7/13/entrez PY - 2020/7/13/pubmed PY - 2020/7/15/medline KW - Offline-AMS (aerosol mass spectrometer) analysis KW - PM(2.5) KW - Source apportionment KW - Suburban Beijing KW - WSOA (Water-soluble organic aerosol) SP - 99 EP - 110 JF - Journal of environmental sciences (China) JO - J Environ Sci (China) VL - 95 N2 - PM2.5 filter sampling and components measurement were conducted in autumn and winter from 2014 to 2015 at a suburban site (referred herein as "LLH site") located in the southwest of Beijing. The offline aerosol mass spectrometry (offline-AMS) analysis and positive matrix factorization (PMF) were applied for measurement and source apportionment of water-soluble organic aerosol (WSOA). Organic aerosol (OA) always dominated PM2.5 during the sampling period, especially in winter. WSOA pollution was serious during the polluted period both in autumn (31.1 µg/m3) and winter (31.9 µg/m3), while WSOA accounted for 54.4% of OA during the polluted period in autumn, much more than that (21.3%) in winter. The oxidation degree of WSOA at LLH site was at a high level (oxygen-to-carbon ratio, O/C=0.91) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) contributed more mass ratio of WSOA than primary organic aerosol (POA) during the whole observation period. In winter, coal combustion OA (CCOA) was a stable source of OA and on average accounted for 25.1% of WSOA. In autumn, biomass burning OA (BBOA) from household combustion contributed 38.3% of WSOA during polluted period. In addition to oxygenated OA (OOA), aqueous-oxygenated OA (aq-OOA) was identified as an important factor of SOA. During heavy pollution period, the mass proportion of aq-OOA to WSOA increased significantly, implying the significant SOA formation through aqueous-phase process. The result of this study highlights the concentration on controlling the residential coal and biomass burning, as well as the research needs on aqueous chemistry in OA formation. SN - 1001-0742 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32653198/Chemical_characteristics_and_sources_of_water-soluble_organic_aerosol_in_southwest_suburb_of_Beijing L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1001-0742(20)30151-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -