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Palmitoylated Proteins in Dendritic Spine Remodeling.
Front Synaptic Neurosci. 2020; 12:22.FS

Abstract

Activity-responsive changes in the actin cytoskeleton are required for the biogenesis, motility, and remodeling of dendritic spines. These changes are governed by proteins that regulate the polymerization, depolymerization, bundling, and branching of actin filaments. Thus, processes that have been extensively characterized in the context of non-neuronal cell shape change and migration are also critical for learning and memory. In this review article, we highlight actin regulatory proteins that associate, at least transiently, with the dendritic plasma membrane. All of these proteins have been shown, either in directed studies or in high-throughput screens, to undergo palmitoylation, a potentially reversible, and stimulus-dependent cysteine modification. Palmitoylation increases the affinity of peripheral proteins for the membrane bilayer and contributes to their subcellular localization and recruitment to cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.Department of Physiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32655390

Citation

Albanesi, Joseph P., et al. "Palmitoylated Proteins in Dendritic Spine Remodeling." Frontiers in Synaptic Neuroscience, vol. 12, 2020, p. 22.
Albanesi JP, Barylko B, DeMartino GN, et al. Palmitoylated Proteins in Dendritic Spine Remodeling. Front Synaptic Neurosci. 2020;12:22.
Albanesi, J. P., Barylko, B., DeMartino, G. N., & Jameson, D. M. (2020). Palmitoylated Proteins in Dendritic Spine Remodeling. Frontiers in Synaptic Neuroscience, 12, 22. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsyn.2020.00022
Albanesi JP, et al. Palmitoylated Proteins in Dendritic Spine Remodeling. Front Synaptic Neurosci. 2020;12:22. PubMed PMID: 32655390.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Palmitoylated Proteins in Dendritic Spine Remodeling. AU - Albanesi,Joseph P, AU - Barylko,Barbara, AU - DeMartino,George N, AU - Jameson,David M, Y1 - 2020/06/16/ PY - 2020/02/24/received PY - 2020/05/12/accepted PY - 2020/7/14/entrez PY - 2020/7/14/pubmed PY - 2020/7/14/medline KW - actin assembly KW - cytoskeletal remodeling KW - dendritic spines KW - palmitoylation KW - synaptic plasticity SP - 22 EP - 22 JF - Frontiers in synaptic neuroscience JO - Front Synaptic Neurosci VL - 12 N2 - Activity-responsive changes in the actin cytoskeleton are required for the biogenesis, motility, and remodeling of dendritic spines. These changes are governed by proteins that regulate the polymerization, depolymerization, bundling, and branching of actin filaments. Thus, processes that have been extensively characterized in the context of non-neuronal cell shape change and migration are also critical for learning and memory. In this review article, we highlight actin regulatory proteins that associate, at least transiently, with the dendritic plasma membrane. All of these proteins have been shown, either in directed studies or in high-throughput screens, to undergo palmitoylation, a potentially reversible, and stimulus-dependent cysteine modification. Palmitoylation increases the affinity of peripheral proteins for the membrane bilayer and contributes to their subcellular localization and recruitment to cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. SN - 1663-3563 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32655390/Palmitoylated_Proteins_in_Dendritic_Spine_Remodeling L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsyn.2020.00022 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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