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Prevalence, risk factors and clinical correlates of depression in quarantined population during the COVID-19 outbreak.
J Affect Disord. 2020 10 01; 275:119-124.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The COVID-19 outbreak has brought tremendous psychological pressure to the general population, which may lead to depression. Therefore, this study aim to evaluate the prevalence and clinical correlates of depressive symptoms in the general population quarantined during the COVID-19 outbreak in Shenzhen.

METHODS

2237 quarantined general individuals participated in this cross-sectional study from February 14 to March 4, 2020, during their 14 days quarantine. They completed the Zung's Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) for depression, Zung's self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) for anxiety, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for sleep quality, and the Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R) for post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS).

RESULTS

The prevalence of depressive symptom was 6.21% in quarantined individuals. The depressed group were younger, less married and educated, and had higher SAS, PSQI, IES-R total scores (all p<0.05), as well as more avoidance, intrusion and hyperarousal symptoms than the non-depressed group. Correlation analysis showed significant correlations between SDS score and the following parameters: age, marriage, education, SAS, PSQI, IES-R total and its three subscale scores (Bonferroni corrected all p<0.05). Further multiple regression indicated that age, marriage, education, SAS, PSQI, IES-R total score, Avoidance and Hyperarousal factor were independent predictors of depressive symptom.

LIMITATIONS

This study adopted a cross-sectional design and used self-report questionnaires.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest an elevated prevalence of depressive symptom in quarantined general individuals in Shenzhen. Some demographic and clinical variables were associated with depressive symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Shenzhen Nanshan People's Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.Shenzhen Nanshan People's Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.Shenzhen Nanshan People's Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.Shenzhen Nanshan People's Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.Department of Psychiatry, Shenzhen Nanshan People's Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.Department of Psychiatry, Shenzhen Nanshan People's Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.Shenzhen Nanshan People's Hospital of Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.School of Psychology, Shenzhen University, China.School of Psychology, Shenzhen University, China.Department of Infectious Diseases and Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Endogenous Infection, Shenzhen Nanshan People's Hospital of Shenzhen University, No 89, Taoyuan Road, Nanshan District, Shenzhen 518052, China.Department of Infectious Diseases and Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Endogenous Infection, Shenzhen Nanshan People's Hospital of Shenzhen University, No 89, Taoyuan Road, Nanshan District, Shenzhen 518052, China. Electronic address: qiwendeng@hotmail.com.CAS Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16 Lincui Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China; Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: zhangxy@psych.ac.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32658813

Citation

Peng, Min, et al. "Prevalence, Risk Factors and Clinical Correlates of Depression in Quarantined Population During the COVID-19 Outbreak." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 275, 2020, pp. 119-124.
Peng M, Mo B, Liu Y, et al. Prevalence, risk factors and clinical correlates of depression in quarantined population during the COVID-19 outbreak. J Affect Disord. 2020;275:119-124.
Peng, M., Mo, B., Liu, Y., Xu, M., Song, X., Liu, L., Fang, Y., Guo, T., Ye, J., Yu, Z., Deng, Q., & Zhang, X. (2020). Prevalence, risk factors and clinical correlates of depression in quarantined population during the COVID-19 outbreak. Journal of Affective Disorders, 275, 119-124. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.06.035
Peng M, et al. Prevalence, Risk Factors and Clinical Correlates of Depression in Quarantined Population During the COVID-19 Outbreak. J Affect Disord. 2020 10 1;275:119-124. PubMed PMID: 32658813.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence, risk factors and clinical correlates of depression in quarantined population during the COVID-19 outbreak. AU - Peng,Min, AU - Mo,Beirong, AU - Liu,Yansong, AU - Xu,Mingming, AU - Song,Xinran, AU - Liu,Luyu, AU - Fang,Yeqing, AU - Guo,Tianyou, AU - Ye,Jinying, AU - Yu,Zhijian, AU - Deng,Qiwen, AU - Zhang,Xiangyang, Y1 - 2020/07/02/ PY - 2020/05/19/received PY - 2020/06/15/revised PY - 2020/06/26/accepted PY - 2020/7/14/pubmed PY - 2020/8/25/medline PY - 2020/7/14/entrez KW - Anxiety KW - COVID-19 KW - Depression KW - Post-traumatic stress symptoms KW - Quarantine KW - Sleep quality SP - 119 EP - 124 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 275 N2 - BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak has brought tremendous psychological pressure to the general population, which may lead to depression. Therefore, this study aim to evaluate the prevalence and clinical correlates of depressive symptoms in the general population quarantined during the COVID-19 outbreak in Shenzhen. METHODS: 2237 quarantined general individuals participated in this cross-sectional study from February 14 to March 4, 2020, during their 14 days quarantine. They completed the Zung's Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) for depression, Zung's self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) for anxiety, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for sleep quality, and the Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R) for post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). RESULTS: The prevalence of depressive symptom was 6.21% in quarantined individuals. The depressed group were younger, less married and educated, and had higher SAS, PSQI, IES-R total scores (all p<0.05), as well as more avoidance, intrusion and hyperarousal symptoms than the non-depressed group. Correlation analysis showed significant correlations between SDS score and the following parameters: age, marriage, education, SAS, PSQI, IES-R total and its three subscale scores (Bonferroni corrected all p<0.05). Further multiple regression indicated that age, marriage, education, SAS, PSQI, IES-R total score, Avoidance and Hyperarousal factor were independent predictors of depressive symptom. LIMITATIONS: This study adopted a cross-sectional design and used self-report questionnaires. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest an elevated prevalence of depressive symptom in quarantined general individuals in Shenzhen. Some demographic and clinical variables were associated with depressive symptoms. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32658813/Prevalence_risk_factors_and_clinical_correlates_of_depression_in_quarantined_population_during_the_COVID_19_outbreak_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(20)32393-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -