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Quantile-Specific Heritability of Intakes of Alcohol but not Other Macronutrients.
Behav Genet. 2020 Sep; 50(5):332-345.BG

Abstract

Genetic heritability (h2) of alcohol use is reported to be greater in rural dwellers, distressed marriages, low socioeconomic status, in girls who are unmarried or lacking closeness with their parents or religious upbringing, in less-educated men, and in adolescents with peers using alcohol. However, these are all risk factors for heavy drinking, and the greater heritability could be due to quantile-dependent expressivity, i.e., h2 dependent upon whether the phenotype (alcohol intake) is high or low relative to its distribution. Quantile regression showed that h2 estimated from the offspring-parent regression slope increased significantly from lowest to highest gram/day of alcohol consumption (0.006 ± 0.001 per percent, P = 1.1 × 10-7). Heritability at the 90th percentile of the sample distribution (0.557 ± 0.116) was 4.5-fold greater than at the 10th percentile (0.122 ± 0.037). Heritabilities for intakes of other macronutrients were not quantile-dependent. Thus quantile-dependent expressivity may explain the higher estimated heritability associated with risk factors for high alcohol consumption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Molecular Biophysics & Integrated Bioimaging Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. ptwilliams@lbl.gov.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32661760

Citation

Williams, Paul T.. "Quantile-Specific Heritability of Intakes of Alcohol but Not Other Macronutrients." Behavior Genetics, vol. 50, no. 5, 2020, pp. 332-345.
Williams PT. Quantile-Specific Heritability of Intakes of Alcohol but not Other Macronutrients. Behav Genet. 2020;50(5):332-345.
Williams, P. T. (2020). Quantile-Specific Heritability of Intakes of Alcohol but not Other Macronutrients. Behavior Genetics, 50(5), 332-345. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10519-020-10005-z
Williams PT. Quantile-Specific Heritability of Intakes of Alcohol but Not Other Macronutrients. Behav Genet. 2020;50(5):332-345. PubMed PMID: 32661760.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quantile-Specific Heritability of Intakes of Alcohol but not Other Macronutrients. A1 - Williams,Paul T, Y1 - 2020/07/13/ PY - 2019/10/14/received PY - 2020/06/24/accepted PY - 2020/7/15/pubmed PY - 2020/7/15/medline PY - 2020/7/15/entrez KW - Alcohol KW - Beer KW - Genetics KW - Heritability KW - Macronutrients KW - Mixed drinks KW - Wine SP - 332 EP - 345 JF - Behavior genetics JO - Behav. Genet. VL - 50 IS - 5 N2 - Genetic heritability (h2) of alcohol use is reported to be greater in rural dwellers, distressed marriages, low socioeconomic status, in girls who are unmarried or lacking closeness with their parents or religious upbringing, in less-educated men, and in adolescents with peers using alcohol. However, these are all risk factors for heavy drinking, and the greater heritability could be due to quantile-dependent expressivity, i.e., h2 dependent upon whether the phenotype (alcohol intake) is high or low relative to its distribution. Quantile regression showed that h2 estimated from the offspring-parent regression slope increased significantly from lowest to highest gram/day of alcohol consumption (0.006 ± 0.001 per percent, P = 1.1 × 10-7). Heritability at the 90th percentile of the sample distribution (0.557 ± 0.116) was 4.5-fold greater than at the 10th percentile (0.122 ± 0.037). Heritabilities for intakes of other macronutrients were not quantile-dependent. Thus quantile-dependent expressivity may explain the higher estimated heritability associated with risk factors for high alcohol consumption. SN - 1573-3297 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32661760/Quantile_Specific_Heritability_of_Intakes_of_Alcohol_but_not_Other_Macronutrients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10519-020-10005-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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