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The relationship between perceived milk supply and exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months postpartum: a cross-sectional study.
Int Breastfeed J. 2020 Jul 17; 15(1):65.IB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Perceived milk supply is an important modifiable factor for optimal breastfeeding. However, little is known about maternal perception of milk supply or how it impacts breastfeeding practices. The aim of this study was to examine relationships of perceived milk supply, maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy, and skin-to-skin contact with early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding among mothers of infants less than 6 months of age in Indonesia.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Yogyakarta City, Indonesia between August and October 2015. Maternal perception of milk supply was assessed using the Hill and Humenick Lactation Scale. Data on breastfeeding practices, and maternal and infant factors were collected using a structured questionnaire. Multiple regression and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to obtain estimates of associations.

RESULTS

Thirty four percent of mothers had initiated breastfeeding within an hour after birth, and 62.4% of mothers were exclusively breastfeeding. High levels of perceived breast milk supply were reported in mothers who practiced skin-to-skin contact or rooming-in with their infants, experienced positive infant sucking behavior, or had high breastfeeding self-efficacy (p < 0.05). Mothers with a higher level of perceived milk production (Odds Ratio [OR] 3.20; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.76, 5.83) or practicing skin-to-skin contact (OR 2.36; 95% CI 1.13, 4.91) were more likely to exclusively breastfeed, while employed mothers were less likely to breastfeed their infants exclusively (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.24, 0.93).

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding self-efficacy are important determinants of perceived milk supply. Higher perception of milk supply was positively linked with exclusive breastfeeding. Our study highlights the importance of the assessment for mother's perception of milk supply, maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy, and skin-to-skin contact in achieving optimal breastfeeding outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric and Maternity Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada , Yogyakarta, Indonesia. School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.Applied Psychology, Faculty of Education, Western University, London, ON, Canada.School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. sykuo@tmu.edu.tw.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32680551

Citation

Sandhi, Ayyu, et al. "The Relationship Between Perceived Milk Supply and Exclusive Breastfeeding During the First Six Months Postpartum: a Cross-sectional Study." International Breastfeeding Journal, vol. 15, no. 1, 2020, p. 65.
Sandhi A, Lee GT, Chipojola R, et al. The relationship between perceived milk supply and exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months postpartum: a cross-sectional study. Int Breastfeed J. 2020;15(1):65.
Sandhi, A., Lee, G. T., Chipojola, R., Huda, M. H., & Kuo, S. Y. (2020). The relationship between perceived milk supply and exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months postpartum: a cross-sectional study. International Breastfeeding Journal, 15(1), 65. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13006-020-00310-y
Sandhi A, et al. The Relationship Between Perceived Milk Supply and Exclusive Breastfeeding During the First Six Months Postpartum: a Cross-sectional Study. Int Breastfeed J. 2020 Jul 17;15(1):65. PubMed PMID: 32680551.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between perceived milk supply and exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months postpartum: a cross-sectional study. AU - Sandhi,Ayyu, AU - Lee,Gabrielle T, AU - Chipojola,Roselyn, AU - Huda,Mega Hasanul, AU - Kuo,Shu-Yu, Y1 - 2020/07/17/ PY - 2020/1/7/received PY - 2020/7/13/accepted PY - 2020/7/19/entrez PY - 2020/7/19/pubmed PY - 2021/5/18/medline KW - Breast milk KW - Breastfeeding KW - Human milk KW - Infant feeding KW - Insufficient milk KW - Lactation KW - Milk supply KW - Perception KW - Postnatal care KW - Self-efficacy SP - 65 EP - 65 JF - International breastfeeding journal JO - Int Breastfeed J VL - 15 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Perceived milk supply is an important modifiable factor for optimal breastfeeding. However, little is known about maternal perception of milk supply or how it impacts breastfeeding practices. The aim of this study was to examine relationships of perceived milk supply, maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy, and skin-to-skin contact with early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding among mothers of infants less than 6 months of age in Indonesia. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Yogyakarta City, Indonesia between August and October 2015. Maternal perception of milk supply was assessed using the Hill and Humenick Lactation Scale. Data on breastfeeding practices, and maternal and infant factors were collected using a structured questionnaire. Multiple regression and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to obtain estimates of associations. RESULTS: Thirty four percent of mothers had initiated breastfeeding within an hour after birth, and 62.4% of mothers were exclusively breastfeeding. High levels of perceived breast milk supply were reported in mothers who practiced skin-to-skin contact or rooming-in with their infants, experienced positive infant sucking behavior, or had high breastfeeding self-efficacy (p < 0.05). Mothers with a higher level of perceived milk production (Odds Ratio [OR] 3.20; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.76, 5.83) or practicing skin-to-skin contact (OR 2.36; 95% CI 1.13, 4.91) were more likely to exclusively breastfeed, while employed mothers were less likely to breastfeed their infants exclusively (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.24, 0.93). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding self-efficacy are important determinants of perceived milk supply. Higher perception of milk supply was positively linked with exclusive breastfeeding. Our study highlights the importance of the assessment for mother's perception of milk supply, maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy, and skin-to-skin contact in achieving optimal breastfeeding outcomes. SN - 1746-4358 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32680551/The_relationship_between_perceived_milk_supply_and_exclusive_breastfeeding_during_the_first_six_months_postpartum:_a_cross_sectional_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -