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Dietary Interventions to Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's Disease: What the Evidence Shows.
Curr Nutr Rep. 2020 09; 9(3):210-225.CN

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

A variety of potentially modifiable risk factors have been investigated in an attempt to delay/prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among these, dietary regimens and nutritional supplements have been most extensively studied. The purpose of this article is to critically review recent evidence for the Mediterranean/MIND diets along with the use of various vitamins and popular herbal supplements, including curcumin, Ginkgo biloba, and fish oil, among others.

RECENT FINDINGS

The Mediterranean and MIND diets are supported by observational studies performed in community settings, especially in the group with high adherence to the Mediterranean diet and with moderate-high adherence to the MIND diet. Randomized controlled trials of various vitamins and supplements have, in general, not shown statistically significant results, although there has been some promising evidence for vitamin D supplementation and curcumin use. There is sufficient data to recommend the Mediterranean and MIND diets to delay the onset of AD. It is judicious to supplement vitamin D, especially in deficient patients, and to consider the use of curcumin to improve cognitive performance. Future research should focus on larger, controlled trials in diverse populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, 63104, USA.Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, 63104, USA.Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, 63104, USA.Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, 63104, USA. binu.chakkamparambil@health.slu.edu.Mercy Hospital, Washington, MO, 63090, USA.Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, 63104, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32681411

Citation

Bartochowski, Zachary, et al. "Dietary Interventions to Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's Disease: what the Evidence Shows." Current Nutrition Reports, vol. 9, no. 3, 2020, pp. 210-225.
Bartochowski Z, Conway J, Wallach Y, et al. Dietary Interventions to Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's Disease: What the Evidence Shows. Curr Nutr Rep. 2020;9(3):210-225.
Bartochowski, Z., Conway, J., Wallach, Y., Chakkamparambil, B., Alakkassery, S., & Grossberg, G. T. (2020). Dietary Interventions to Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's Disease: What the Evidence Shows. Current Nutrition Reports, 9(3), 210-225. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13668-020-00333-1
Bartochowski Z, et al. Dietary Interventions to Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's Disease: what the Evidence Shows. Curr Nutr Rep. 2020;9(3):210-225. PubMed PMID: 32681411.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Interventions to Prevent or Delay Alzheimer's Disease: What the Evidence Shows. AU - Bartochowski,Zachary, AU - Conway,Joseph, AU - Wallach,Yisrael, AU - Chakkamparambil,Binu, AU - Alakkassery,Suraj, AU - Grossberg,George T, PY - 2020/7/19/pubmed PY - 2021/1/7/medline PY - 2020/7/19/entrez KW - Alzheimer’s disease and nutrition KW - Dietary interventions in AD KW - MIND diet and Alzheimer’s disease KW - Mediterranean diet and cognition KW - Microbiota and Alzheimer’s disease KW - Vitamins and supplements in AD SP - 210 EP - 225 JF - Current nutrition reports JO - Curr Nutr Rep VL - 9 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A variety of potentially modifiable risk factors have been investigated in an attempt to delay/prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among these, dietary regimens and nutritional supplements have been most extensively studied. The purpose of this article is to critically review recent evidence for the Mediterranean/MIND diets along with the use of various vitamins and popular herbal supplements, including curcumin, Ginkgo biloba, and fish oil, among others. RECENT FINDINGS: The Mediterranean and MIND diets are supported by observational studies performed in community settings, especially in the group with high adherence to the Mediterranean diet and with moderate-high adherence to the MIND diet. Randomized controlled trials of various vitamins and supplements have, in general, not shown statistically significant results, although there has been some promising evidence for vitamin D supplementation and curcumin use. There is sufficient data to recommend the Mediterranean and MIND diets to delay the onset of AD. It is judicious to supplement vitamin D, especially in deficient patients, and to consider the use of curcumin to improve cognitive performance. Future research should focus on larger, controlled trials in diverse populations. SN - 2161-3311 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32681411/Dietary_Interventions_to_Prevent_or_Delay_Alzheimer's_Disease:_What_the_Evidence_Shows_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/alzheimersdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -