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Coronavirus Disease 2019: Coronaviruses and Kidney Injury.
J Urol. 2020 11; 204(5):918-925.JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

The first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was identified and confirmed in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. COVID-19 is gradually posing a serious threat to global public health. In this review the characteristics and mechanism of kidney injury caused by SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 infection are summarized and contrasted. In particular, urine-oral transmission, prevention and management of the kidney injury caused by SARS-CoV-2 are emphasized.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We searched PubMed® for English language articles published since 2003 with the keywords "SARS," "MERS," "COVID-19" or "kidney injury." ClinicalTrials.gov was queried for ongoing studies. We also used relevant data from websites, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

RESULTS

Similar to 2 other coronaviruses including SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2 caused severe respiratory syndrome with rapid progression and kidney injury. The infection process of SARS-CoV-2 is mediated by specifically binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. Cases of COVID-19 combined with kidney impairment are associated with a higher risk of mortality than those without comorbidities. The pathological changes of the kidney are mainly due to local SARS-CoV-2 replication or indirectly by pro-inflammatory cytokine response. In addition, studies have confirmed the isolation of infectious SARS-CoV-2 in urine, raising the possibility of urine-oral transmission. Ultimately this is significant for preventing potential urine-oral transmission and improving the cure rate of acute kidney injury with COVID-19.

CONCLUSIONS

Emerging evidence supports that in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infections the prevalence of kidney injury is high and usually leads to a poor prognosis. Optimal prevention and management of kidney injury will benefit patients with COVID-19.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32693711

Citation

Lv, Wenchang, et al. "Coronavirus Disease 2019: Coronaviruses and Kidney Injury." The Journal of Urology, vol. 204, no. 5, 2020, pp. 918-925.
Lv W, Wu M, Ren Y, et al. Coronavirus Disease 2019: Coronaviruses and Kidney Injury. J Urol. 2020;204(5):918-925.
Lv, W., Wu, M., Ren, Y., Zeng, N., Deng, P., Zeng, H., Zhang, Q., & Wu, Y. (2020). Coronavirus Disease 2019: Coronaviruses and Kidney Injury. The Journal of Urology, 204(5), 918-925. https://doi.org/10.1097/JU.0000000000001289
Lv W, et al. Coronavirus Disease 2019: Coronaviruses and Kidney Injury. J Urol. 2020;204(5):918-925. PubMed PMID: 32693711.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coronavirus Disease 2019: Coronaviruses and Kidney Injury. AU - Lv,Wenchang, AU - Wu,Min, AU - Ren,Yuping, AU - Zeng,Ning, AU - Deng,Pei, AU - Zeng,Hong, AU - Zhang,Qi, AU - Wu,Yiping, Y1 - 2020/07/17/ PY - 2020/7/23/pubmed PY - 2020/10/24/medline PY - 2020/7/23/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus KW - SARS virus KW - acute kidney injury SP - 918 EP - 925 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J Urol VL - 204 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: The first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was identified and confirmed in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. COVID-19 is gradually posing a serious threat to global public health. In this review the characteristics and mechanism of kidney injury caused by SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 infection are summarized and contrasted. In particular, urine-oral transmission, prevention and management of the kidney injury caused by SARS-CoV-2 are emphasized. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched PubMed® for English language articles published since 2003 with the keywords "SARS," "MERS," "COVID-19" or "kidney injury." ClinicalTrials.gov was queried for ongoing studies. We also used relevant data from websites, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. RESULTS: Similar to 2 other coronaviruses including SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2 caused severe respiratory syndrome with rapid progression and kidney injury. The infection process of SARS-CoV-2 is mediated by specifically binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. Cases of COVID-19 combined with kidney impairment are associated with a higher risk of mortality than those without comorbidities. The pathological changes of the kidney are mainly due to local SARS-CoV-2 replication or indirectly by pro-inflammatory cytokine response. In addition, studies have confirmed the isolation of infectious SARS-CoV-2 in urine, raising the possibility of urine-oral transmission. Ultimately this is significant for preventing potential urine-oral transmission and improving the cure rate of acute kidney injury with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Emerging evidence supports that in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infections the prevalence of kidney injury is high and usually leads to a poor prognosis. Optimal prevention and management of kidney injury will benefit patients with COVID-19. SN - 1527-3792 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32693711/Coronavirus_Disease_2019:_Coronaviruses_and_Kidney_Injury_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/10.1097/JU.0000000000001289?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -