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Monoclonal antibodies for the S2 subunit of spike of SARS-CoV-1 cross-react with the newly-emerged SARS-CoV-2.
Euro Surveill. 2020 07; 25(28)ES

Abstract

BackgroundA novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, which emerged at the end of 2019 and causes COVID-19, has resulted in worldwide human infections. While genetically distinct, SARS-CoV-1, the aetiological agent responsible for an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002-2003, utilises the same host cell receptor as SARS-CoV-2 for entry: angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Parts of the SARS-CoV-1 spike glycoprotein (S protein), which interacts with ACE2, appear conserved in SARS-CoV-2.AimThe cross-reactivity with SARS-CoV-2 of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) previously generated against the S protein of SARS-CoV-1 was assessed.MethodsThe SARS-CoV-2 S protein sequence was aligned to those of SARS-CoV-1, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and common-cold coronaviruses. Abilities of mAbs generated against SARS-CoV-1 S protein to bind SARS-CoV-2 or its S protein were tested with SARS-CoV-2 infected cells as well as cells expressing either the full length protein or a fragment of its S2 subunit. Quantitative ELISA was also performed to compare binding of mAbs to recombinant S protein.ResultsAn immunogenic domain in the S2 subunit of SARS-CoV-1 S protein is highly conserved in SARS-CoV-2 but not in MERS and human common-cold coronaviruses. Four murine mAbs raised against this immunogenic fragment could recognise SARS-CoV-2 S protein expressed in mammalian cell lines. In particular, mAb 1A9 was demonstrated to detect S protein in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells and is suitable for use in a sandwich ELISA format.ConclusionThe cross-reactive mAbs may serve as useful tools for SARS-CoV-2 research and for the development of diagnostic assays for COVID-19.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Immunology programme, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore. Infectious Diseases programme, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore.Public Health Agency of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.National Public Health Laboratory (NPHL), National Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCID), Singapore. Department of Biological Sciences (DBS), National University of Singapore, Singapore. Bioinformatics Institute (BII), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore.Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore.Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore.Immunology programme, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore. Infectious Diseases programme, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore.Immunology programme, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore. Infectious Diseases programme, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore.Infectious Diseases programme, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore. National Public Health Laboratory (NPHL), National Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCID), Singapore.National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden. Public Health Agency of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore.Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore. Immunology programme, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore. Infectious Diseases programme, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System (NUHS), National University of Singapore, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32700671

Citation

Zheng, Zhiqiang, et al. "Monoclonal Antibodies for the S2 Subunit of Spike of SARS-CoV-1 Cross-react With the Newly-emerged SARS-CoV-2." Euro Surveillance : Bulletin Europeen Sur Les Maladies Transmissibles = European Communicable Disease Bulletin, vol. 25, no. 28, 2020.
Zheng Z, Monteil VM, Maurer-Stroh S, et al. Monoclonal antibodies for the S2 subunit of spike of SARS-CoV-1 cross-react with the newly-emerged SARS-CoV-2. Euro Surveill. 2020;25(28).
Zheng, Z., Monteil, V. M., Maurer-Stroh, S., Yew, C. W., Leong, C., Mohd-Ismail, N. K., Cheyyatraivendran Arularasu, S., Chow, V. T. K., Lin, R. T. P., Mirazimi, A., Hong, W., & Tan, Y. J. (2020). Monoclonal antibodies for the S2 subunit of spike of SARS-CoV-1 cross-react with the newly-emerged SARS-CoV-2. Euro Surveillance : Bulletin Europeen Sur Les Maladies Transmissibles = European Communicable Disease Bulletin, 25(28). https://doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.28.2000291
Zheng Z, et al. Monoclonal Antibodies for the S2 Subunit of Spike of SARS-CoV-1 Cross-react With the Newly-emerged SARS-CoV-2. Euro Surveill. 2020;25(28) PubMed PMID: 32700671.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Monoclonal antibodies for the S2 subunit of spike of SARS-CoV-1 cross-react with the newly-emerged SARS-CoV-2. AU - Zheng,Zhiqiang, AU - Monteil,Vanessa Marthe, AU - Maurer-Stroh,Sebastian, AU - Yew,Chow Wenn, AU - Leong,Carol, AU - Mohd-Ismail,Nur Khairiah, AU - Cheyyatraivendran Arularasu,Suganya, AU - Chow,Vincent Tak Kwong, AU - Lin,Raymond Tzer Pin, AU - Mirazimi,Ali, AU - Hong,Wanjin, AU - Tan,Yee-Joo, PY - 2020/7/24/entrez PY - 2020/7/24/pubmed PY - 2020/7/30/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - coronavirus disease 2019 KW - cross-reactive antibodies KW - spike protein JF - Euro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin JO - Euro Surveill VL - 25 IS - 28 N2 - BackgroundA novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, which emerged at the end of 2019 and causes COVID-19, has resulted in worldwide human infections. While genetically distinct, SARS-CoV-1, the aetiological agent responsible for an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002-2003, utilises the same host cell receptor as SARS-CoV-2 for entry: angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Parts of the SARS-CoV-1 spike glycoprotein (S protein), which interacts with ACE2, appear conserved in SARS-CoV-2.AimThe cross-reactivity with SARS-CoV-2 of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) previously generated against the S protein of SARS-CoV-1 was assessed.MethodsThe SARS-CoV-2 S protein sequence was aligned to those of SARS-CoV-1, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and common-cold coronaviruses. Abilities of mAbs generated against SARS-CoV-1 S protein to bind SARS-CoV-2 or its S protein were tested with SARS-CoV-2 infected cells as well as cells expressing either the full length protein or a fragment of its S2 subunit. Quantitative ELISA was also performed to compare binding of mAbs to recombinant S protein.ResultsAn immunogenic domain in the S2 subunit of SARS-CoV-1 S protein is highly conserved in SARS-CoV-2 but not in MERS and human common-cold coronaviruses. Four murine mAbs raised against this immunogenic fragment could recognise SARS-CoV-2 S protein expressed in mammalian cell lines. In particular, mAb 1A9 was demonstrated to detect S protein in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells and is suitable for use in a sandwich ELISA format.ConclusionThe cross-reactive mAbs may serve as useful tools for SARS-CoV-2 research and for the development of diagnostic assays for COVID-19. SN - 1560-7917 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32700671/Monoclonal_antibodies_for_the_S2_subunit_of_spike_of_SARS_CoV_1_cross_react_with_the_newly_emerged_SARS_CoV_2_ L2 - http://www.eurosurveillance.org/content/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.28.2000291 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -