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Coagulation Status and Venous Thromboembolism Risk in African Americans: A Potential Risk Factor in COVID-19.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2020 Jan-Dec; 26:1076029620943671.CA

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection (COVID-19) is known to induce severe inflammation and activation of the coagulation system, resulting in a prothrombotic state. Although inflammatory conditions and organ-specific diseases have been shown to be strong determinants of morbidity and mortality in patients with COVID-19, it is unclear whether preexisting differences in coagulation impact the severity of COVID-19. African Americans have higher rates of COVID-19 infection and disease-related morbidity and mortality. Moreover, African Americans are known to be at a higher risk for thrombotic events due to both biological and socioeconomic factors. In this review, we explore whether differences in baseline coagulation status and medical management of coagulation play an important role in COVID-19 disease severity and contribute to racial disparity trends within COVID-19.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA.Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32702995

Citation

Frydman, Galit H., et al. "Coagulation Status and Venous Thromboembolism Risk in African Americans: a Potential Risk Factor in COVID-19." Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/hemostasis : Official Journal of the International Academy of Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, vol. 26, 2020, p. 1076029620943671.
Frydman GH, Boyer EW, Nazarian RM, et al. Coagulation Status and Venous Thromboembolism Risk in African Americans: A Potential Risk Factor in COVID-19. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2020;26:1076029620943671.
Frydman, G. H., Boyer, E. W., Nazarian, R. M., Van Cott, E. M., & Piazza, G. (2020). Coagulation Status and Venous Thromboembolism Risk in African Americans: A Potential Risk Factor in COVID-19. Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/hemostasis : Official Journal of the International Academy of Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, 26, 1076029620943671. https://doi.org/10.1177/1076029620943671
Frydman GH, et al. Coagulation Status and Venous Thromboembolism Risk in African Americans: a Potential Risk Factor in COVID-19. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 2020 Jan-Dec;26:1076029620943671. PubMed PMID: 32702995.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coagulation Status and Venous Thromboembolism Risk in African Americans: A Potential Risk Factor in COVID-19. AU - Frydman,Galit H, AU - Boyer,Edward W, AU - Nazarian,Rosalynn M, AU - Van Cott,Elizabeth M, AU - Piazza,Gregory, PY - 2020/7/25/entrez PY - 2020/7/25/pubmed PY - 2020/8/1/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - anticoagulation KW - coagulation KW - ethnicity KW - race KW - thrombosis SP - 1076029620943671 EP - 1076029620943671 JF - Clinical and applied thrombosis/hemostasis : official journal of the International Academy of Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis JO - Clin Appl Thromb Hemost VL - 26 N2 - Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection (COVID-19) is known to induce severe inflammation and activation of the coagulation system, resulting in a prothrombotic state. Although inflammatory conditions and organ-specific diseases have been shown to be strong determinants of morbidity and mortality in patients with COVID-19, it is unclear whether preexisting differences in coagulation impact the severity of COVID-19. African Americans have higher rates of COVID-19 infection and disease-related morbidity and mortality. Moreover, African Americans are known to be at a higher risk for thrombotic events due to both biological and socioeconomic factors. In this review, we explore whether differences in baseline coagulation status and medical management of coagulation play an important role in COVID-19 disease severity and contribute to racial disparity trends within COVID-19. SN - 1938-2723 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32702995/Coagulation_Status_and_Venous_Thromboembolism_Risk_in_African_Americans:_A_Potential_Risk_Factor_in_COVID_19_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1076029620943671?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -