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Personal Outcomes in Community-based Participatory Research Partnerships: A Cross-site Mixed Methods Study.
Am J Community Psychol. 2020 12; 66(3-4):439-449.AJ

Abstract

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been embraced by diverse populations to address health inequities within their communities. CBPR has been shown to produce favorable health outcomes, but little is known about personal outcomes (e.g., individual growth and capacities) resulting from the direct involvement in a CBPR partnership. We empirically examine which CBPR partnerships' processes and practices are associated with personal outcomes. We hypothesize that higher levels of collaborative approaches and adherence to CBPR principles and practices would be associated with personal outcomes. Based on a national cross-site CBPR study, Research for Improved Health, we utilized mixed-method data from a comprehensive community-engagement survey (N = 450) and seven in-depth case studies to explore the hypothesized relationships. Our multivariate mixed-effects model revealed the importance of various partnering practices. Relationship dynamics emerged as key predictors including the following: respect in the partnership, voice and influence in decision-making among partners, and stewardship. Qualitative findings highlighted individual, partnership, and community-level impacts, within and beyond the partnership. Our findings have implications for CBPR best practices and highlight the potential role of personal outcomes for partnerships' sustainability, long-term outcomes, and health equity research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA.Family and Community Medicine, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA.Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.School of Management and Marketing, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.College of Population Health, Center for Participatory Research, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32706125

Citation

Rodríguez Espinosa, Patricia, et al. "Personal Outcomes in Community-based Participatory Research Partnerships: a Cross-site Mixed Methods Study." American Journal of Community Psychology, vol. 66, no. 3-4, 2020, pp. 439-449.
Rodríguez Espinosa P, Sussman A, Pearson CR, et al. Personal Outcomes in Community-based Participatory Research Partnerships: A Cross-site Mixed Methods Study. Am J Community Psychol. 2020;66(3-4):439-449.
Rodríguez Espinosa, P., Sussman, A., Pearson, C. R., Oetzel, J. G., & Wallerstein, N. (2020). Personal Outcomes in Community-based Participatory Research Partnerships: A Cross-site Mixed Methods Study. American Journal of Community Psychology, 66(3-4), 439-449. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajcp.12446
Rodríguez Espinosa P, et al. Personal Outcomes in Community-based Participatory Research Partnerships: a Cross-site Mixed Methods Study. Am J Community Psychol. 2020;66(3-4):439-449. PubMed PMID: 32706125.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Personal Outcomes in Community-based Participatory Research Partnerships: A Cross-site Mixed Methods Study. AU - Rodríguez Espinosa,Patricia, AU - Sussman,Andrew, AU - Pearson,Cynthia R, AU - Oetzel,John G, AU - Wallerstein,Nina, Y1 - 2020/07/24/ PY - 2021/12/01/pmc-release PY - 2020/7/25/pubmed PY - 2021/9/10/medline PY - 2020/7/25/entrez KW - Capacity KW - Community-academic research partnerships KW - Community-based participatory research KW - Community-engaged research KW - Health equity KW - Personal outcomes SP - 439 EP - 449 JF - American journal of community psychology JO - Am J Community Psychol VL - 66 IS - 3-4 N2 - Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been embraced by diverse populations to address health inequities within their communities. CBPR has been shown to produce favorable health outcomes, but little is known about personal outcomes (e.g., individual growth and capacities) resulting from the direct involvement in a CBPR partnership. We empirically examine which CBPR partnerships' processes and practices are associated with personal outcomes. We hypothesize that higher levels of collaborative approaches and adherence to CBPR principles and practices would be associated with personal outcomes. Based on a national cross-site CBPR study, Research for Improved Health, we utilized mixed-method data from a comprehensive community-engagement survey (N = 450) and seven in-depth case studies to explore the hypothesized relationships. Our multivariate mixed-effects model revealed the importance of various partnering practices. Relationship dynamics emerged as key predictors including the following: respect in the partnership, voice and influence in decision-making among partners, and stewardship. Qualitative findings highlighted individual, partnership, and community-level impacts, within and beyond the partnership. Our findings have implications for CBPR best practices and highlight the potential role of personal outcomes for partnerships' sustainability, long-term outcomes, and health equity research. SN - 1573-2770 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32706125/Personal_Outcomes_in_Community-based_Participatory_Research_Partnerships:_A_Cross-site_Mixed_Methods_Study. L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajcp.12446 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -