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Viable SARS-CoV-2 in various specimens from COVID-19 patients.
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2020 Nov; 26(11):1520-1524.CM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim was to determine whether various clinical specimens obtained from COVID-19 patients contain the infectious virus.

METHODS

To demonstrate whether various clinical specimens contain the viable virus, we collected naso/oropharyngeal swabs and saliva, urine and stool samples from five COVID-19 patients and performed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to assess viral load. Specimens positive with qPCR were subjected to virus isolation in Vero cells. We also used urine and stool samples to intranasally inoculate ferrets and evaluated the virus titres in nasal washes on 2, 4, 6 and 8 days post infection.

RESULTS

SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in all naso/oropharyngeal swabs and saliva, urine and stool samples collected between days 8 and 30 of the clinical course. Notably, viral loads in urine, saliva and stool samples were almost equal to or higher than those in naso/oropharyngeal swabs (urine 1.08 ± 0.16-2.09 ± 0.85 log10 copies/mL, saliva 1.07 ± 0.34-1.65 ± 0.46 log10 copies/mL, stool 1.17 ± 0.32 log10 copies/mL, naso/oropharyngeal swabs 1.18 ± 0.12-1.34 ± 0.30 log10 copies/mL). Further, viable SARS-CoV-2 was isolated from naso/oropharyngeal swabs and saliva of COVID-19 patients, as well as nasal washes of ferrets inoculated with patient urine or stool.

DISCUSSION

Viable SARS-CoV-2 was demonstrated in saliva, urine and stool samples from COVID-19 patients up to days 11-15 of the clinical course. This result suggests that viable SARS-CoV-2 can be secreted in various clinical samples and respiratory specimens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Department of Internal Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Microbiology, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Disease Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Department of Internal Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Microbiology, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Disease Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Internal Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Microbiology, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Disease Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Microbiology, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Disease Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Microbiology, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Disease Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Department of Microbiology, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Disease Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: choiki55@chungbuk.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32711057

Citation

Jeong, Hye Won, et al. "Viable SARS-CoV-2 in Various Specimens From COVID-19 Patients." Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, vol. 26, no. 11, 2020, pp. 1520-1524.
Jeong HW, Kim SM, Kim HS, et al. Viable SARS-CoV-2 in various specimens from COVID-19 patients. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2020;26(11):1520-1524.
Jeong, H. W., Kim, S. M., Kim, H. S., Kim, Y. I., Kim, J. H., Cho, J. Y., Kim, S. H., Kang, H., Kim, S. G., Park, S. J., Kim, E. H., & Choi, Y. K. (2020). Viable SARS-CoV-2 in various specimens from COVID-19 patients. Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 26(11), 1520-1524. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2020.07.020
Jeong HW, et al. Viable SARS-CoV-2 in Various Specimens From COVID-19 Patients. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2020;26(11):1520-1524. PubMed PMID: 32711057.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Viable SARS-CoV-2 in various specimens from COVID-19 patients. AU - Jeong,Hye Won, AU - Kim,Se-Mi, AU - Kim,Hee-Sung, AU - Kim,Young-Il, AU - Kim,Jun Hyoung, AU - Cho,Jun Yeon, AU - Kim,Sun-Hyung, AU - Kang,Hyeran, AU - Kim,Seong-Gyu, AU - Park,Su-Jin, AU - Kim,Eun-Ha, AU - Choi,Young Ki, Y1 - 2020/07/23/ PY - 2020/04/21/received PY - 2020/07/13/revised PY - 2020/07/14/accepted PY - 2020/7/28/pubmed PY - 2020/11/21/medline PY - 2020/7/26/entrez KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - Saliva KW - Shedding KW - Stool KW - Urine SP - 1520 EP - 1524 JF - Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases JO - Clin Microbiol Infect VL - 26 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim was to determine whether various clinical specimens obtained from COVID-19 patients contain the infectious virus. METHODS: To demonstrate whether various clinical specimens contain the viable virus, we collected naso/oropharyngeal swabs and saliva, urine and stool samples from five COVID-19 patients and performed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to assess viral load. Specimens positive with qPCR were subjected to virus isolation in Vero cells. We also used urine and stool samples to intranasally inoculate ferrets and evaluated the virus titres in nasal washes on 2, 4, 6 and 8 days post infection. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in all naso/oropharyngeal swabs and saliva, urine and stool samples collected between days 8 and 30 of the clinical course. Notably, viral loads in urine, saliva and stool samples were almost equal to or higher than those in naso/oropharyngeal swabs (urine 1.08 ± 0.16-2.09 ± 0.85 log10 copies/mL, saliva 1.07 ± 0.34-1.65 ± 0.46 log10 copies/mL, stool 1.17 ± 0.32 log10 copies/mL, naso/oropharyngeal swabs 1.18 ± 0.12-1.34 ± 0.30 log10 copies/mL). Further, viable SARS-CoV-2 was isolated from naso/oropharyngeal swabs and saliva of COVID-19 patients, as well as nasal washes of ferrets inoculated with patient urine or stool. DISCUSSION: Viable SARS-CoV-2 was demonstrated in saliva, urine and stool samples from COVID-19 patients up to days 11-15 of the clinical course. This result suggests that viable SARS-CoV-2 can be secreted in various clinical samples and respiratory specimens. SN - 1469-0691 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32711057/Viable_SARS_CoV_2_in_various_specimens_from_COVID_19_patients_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -