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Definitions, regulations, and new frontiers for dietary fiber and whole grains.
Nutr Rev. 2020 08 01; 78(Suppl 1):6-12.NR

Abstract

The aim of this article is to review the definitions and regulations for dietary fiber and whole grains worldwide and to discuss barriers to meeting recommended intake levels. Plant foods, such as whole grains, that are rich in dietary fiber are universally recommended in dietary guidance. Foods rich in dietary fiber are recommended for all, but dietary recommendations for whole grains and dietary fiber depend on definitions and regulations. Official recommendations for dietary fiber in the United States and Canada are denoted by dietary reference intakes (DRIs), which are developed by the Institute of Medicine. An adequate intake (AI) for dietary fiber was based on prospective cohort studies of dietary fiber intake and cardiovascular disease risk that found 14 grams of dietary fiber per 1000 kilocalories protected against cardiovascular disease (CVD). This value was used to set AIs for dietary fiber across the life cycle based on recommended calorie intakes. Actual intakes of dietary fiber are generally about half of the recommended levels. Recommendations for whole grain intake are equally challenging, as definitions for whole grain foods are needed to set recommendations. The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommended that half of all grain servings be whole grains, but usual intakes are generally less than 1 serving per day, rather than the recommended 3 servings per day. Scientific support for whole grain recommendations is based on the same prospective cohort studies and links to CVD protection used to inform dietary fiber guidance. Thus, dietary fiber is a recommended nutrient and whole grains are a recommended dietary pattern in dietary guidance in North America and around the world. Challenges for attaining recommended intakes of dietary fiber and whole grains include low-carbohydrate diets, low-gluten diets, and public health recommendations to avoid processed foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota, USA.Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32728750

Citation

Korczak, Renee, and Joanne L. Slavin. "Definitions, Regulations, and New Frontiers for Dietary Fiber and Whole Grains." Nutrition Reviews, vol. 78, no. Suppl 1, 2020, pp. 6-12.
Korczak R, Slavin JL. Definitions, regulations, and new frontiers for dietary fiber and whole grains. Nutr Rev. 2020;78(Suppl 1):6-12.
Korczak, R., & Slavin, J. L. (2020). Definitions, regulations, and new frontiers for dietary fiber and whole grains. Nutrition Reviews, 78(Suppl 1), 6-12. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuz061
Korczak R, Slavin JL. Definitions, Regulations, and New Frontiers for Dietary Fiber and Whole Grains. Nutr Rev. 2020 08 1;78(Suppl 1):6-12. PubMed PMID: 32728750.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Definitions, regulations, and new frontiers for dietary fiber and whole grains. AU - Korczak,Renee, AU - Slavin,Joanne L, PY - 2020/7/31/entrez PY - 2020/7/31/pubmed PY - 2021/2/3/medline KW - dietary fiber KW - dietary guidance KW - food patterns KW - food regulations KW - whole grain SP - 6 EP - 12 JF - Nutrition reviews JO - Nutr Rev VL - 78 IS - Suppl 1 N2 - The aim of this article is to review the definitions and regulations for dietary fiber and whole grains worldwide and to discuss barriers to meeting recommended intake levels. Plant foods, such as whole grains, that are rich in dietary fiber are universally recommended in dietary guidance. Foods rich in dietary fiber are recommended for all, but dietary recommendations for whole grains and dietary fiber depend on definitions and regulations. Official recommendations for dietary fiber in the United States and Canada are denoted by dietary reference intakes (DRIs), which are developed by the Institute of Medicine. An adequate intake (AI) for dietary fiber was based on prospective cohort studies of dietary fiber intake and cardiovascular disease risk that found 14 grams of dietary fiber per 1000 kilocalories protected against cardiovascular disease (CVD). This value was used to set AIs for dietary fiber across the life cycle based on recommended calorie intakes. Actual intakes of dietary fiber are generally about half of the recommended levels. Recommendations for whole grain intake are equally challenging, as definitions for whole grain foods are needed to set recommendations. The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommended that half of all grain servings be whole grains, but usual intakes are generally less than 1 serving per day, rather than the recommended 3 servings per day. Scientific support for whole grain recommendations is based on the same prospective cohort studies and links to CVD protection used to inform dietary fiber guidance. Thus, dietary fiber is a recommended nutrient and whole grains are a recommended dietary pattern in dietary guidance in North America and around the world. Challenges for attaining recommended intakes of dietary fiber and whole grains include low-carbohydrate diets, low-gluten diets, and public health recommendations to avoid processed foods. SN - 1753-4887 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32728750/Definitions_regulations_and_new_frontiers_for_dietary_fiber_and_whole_grains_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -