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Extent of infectious SARS-CoV-2 aerosolisation as a result of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond). 2020 Jul 02; 81(7):1-7.BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

COVID-19 has caused an unprecedented pandemic and medical emergency that has changed routine care pathways. This article discusses the extent of aerosolisation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, the virus that causes COVID-19, as a result of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy.

METHODS

PubMed and Google Scholar were searched for relevant publications, using the terms COVID-19 aerosolisation, COVID-19 infection, COVID-19 transmission, COVID-19 pandemic, COVID-19 and endoscopy, Endoscopy for COVID-19 patients.

RESULTS

A total of 3745 articles were identified, 26 of which were selected to answer the question of the extent of SARS-CoV-2 aerosolisation during upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. All studies suggested high infectivity from contact and droplet spread. No clinical study has yet reported the viral load in the aerosol and therefore the infective dose has not been accurately determined. However, aerosol-generating procedures are potentially risky and full personal protective equipment should be used.

CONCLUSIONS

As it is a highly infectious disease, clinicians treating patients with COVID-19 require effective personal protective equipment. The main routes of infection are direct contact and droplets in the air and on surfaces. Aerosolisation carries a substantial risk of infection, so any aerosol-producing procedure, such as endoscopy, should be performed wearing personal protective equipment and with extra caution to protect the endoscopist, staff and patients from cross-infection via the respiratory system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Surgery, Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospital, Doncaster, UK. Department of General Surgery, Medical School, Sheffield University, UK.Department of General Surgery, Princess Royal University Hospital, King's College Hospitals, London, UK.Department of General Surgery, Princess Royal University Hospital, King's College Hospitals, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32730160

Citation

Hussain, Abdulzahra, et al. "Extent of Infectious SARS-CoV-2 Aerosolisation as a Result of Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy or Colonoscopy." British Journal of Hospital Medicine (London, England : 2005), vol. 81, no. 7, 2020, pp. 1-7.
Hussain A, Singhal T, El-Hasani S. Extent of infectious SARS-CoV-2 aerosolisation as a result of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. Br J Hosp Med (Lond). 2020;81(7):1-7.
Hussain, A., Singhal, T., & El-Hasani, S. (2020). Extent of infectious SARS-CoV-2 aerosolisation as a result of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. British Journal of Hospital Medicine (London, England : 2005), 81(7), 1-7. https://doi.org/10.12968/hmed.2020.0348
Hussain A, Singhal T, El-Hasani S. Extent of Infectious SARS-CoV-2 Aerosolisation as a Result of Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy or Colonoscopy. Br J Hosp Med (Lond). 2020 Jul 2;81(7):1-7. PubMed PMID: 32730160.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Extent of infectious SARS-CoV-2 aerosolisation as a result of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. AU - Hussain,Abdulzahra, AU - Singhal,Tarun, AU - El-Hasani,Shamsi, Y1 - 2020/07/06/ PY - 2020/7/31/entrez PY - 2020/7/31/pubmed PY - 2020/8/11/medline KW - Aerosol KW - COVID-19 KW - Lower GI endoscopy KW - Personal protective equipment KW - Upper GI endoscopy SP - 1 EP - 7 JF - British journal of hospital medicine (London, England : 2005) JO - Br J Hosp Med (Lond) VL - 81 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has caused an unprecedented pandemic and medical emergency that has changed routine care pathways. This article discusses the extent of aerosolisation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, the virus that causes COVID-19, as a result of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy. METHODS: PubMed and Google Scholar were searched for relevant publications, using the terms COVID-19 aerosolisation, COVID-19 infection, COVID-19 transmission, COVID-19 pandemic, COVID-19 and endoscopy, Endoscopy for COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: A total of 3745 articles were identified, 26 of which were selected to answer the question of the extent of SARS-CoV-2 aerosolisation during upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. All studies suggested high infectivity from contact and droplet spread. No clinical study has yet reported the viral load in the aerosol and therefore the infective dose has not been accurately determined. However, aerosol-generating procedures are potentially risky and full personal protective equipment should be used. CONCLUSIONS: As it is a highly infectious disease, clinicians treating patients with COVID-19 require effective personal protective equipment. The main routes of infection are direct contact and droplets in the air and on surfaces. Aerosolisation carries a substantial risk of infection, so any aerosol-producing procedure, such as endoscopy, should be performed wearing personal protective equipment and with extra caution to protect the endoscopist, staff and patients from cross-infection via the respiratory system. SN - 1750-8460 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32730160/Extent_of_infectious_SARS_CoV_2_aerosolisation_as_a_result_of_oesophagogastroduodenoscopy_or_colonoscopy_ L2 - https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/hmed.2020.0348?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -