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"The post-COVID era": challenges in the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) after the pandemic.
BMC Med. 2020 07 31; 18(1):241.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Citizens affected by substance use disorders are high-risk populations for both SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19-related mortality. Relevant vulnerabilities to COVID-19 in people who suffer substance use disorders are described in previous communications. The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique opportunity to reshape and update addiction treatment networks.

MAIN BODY

Renewed treatment systems should be based on these seven pillars: (1) telemedicine and digital solutions, (2) hospitalization at home, (3) consultation-liaison psychiatric and addiction services, (4) harm-reduction facilities, (5) person-centered care, (6) promote paid work to improve quality of life in people with substance use disorders, and (7) integrated addiction care. The three "best buys" of the World Health Organization (reduce availability, increase prices, and a ban on advertising) are still valid. Additionally, new strategies must be implemented to systematically deal with (a) fake news concerning legal and illegal drugs and (b) controversial scientific information.

CONCLUSION

The heroin pandemic four decades ago was the last time that addiction treatment systems were updated in many western countries. A revised and modernized addiction treatment network must include improved access to care, facilitated where appropriate by technology; more integrated care with addiction specialists supporting non-specialists; and reducing the stigma experienced by people with SUDs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Grup Recerca Addiccions Clínic (GRAC-GRE), Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clínic Barcelona, Rosselló 149, 08036, Barcelona, Spain. hlopez@clinic.cat. Socidrogalcohol (Spanish Society of Drug and Alcohol Specialists), Barcelona, Spain. hlopez@clinic.cat.Département de psychiatrie et d'addictologie, Université Paris-Saclay, Route de l'Orme aux Merisiers - RD 128 91190 Saint-Aubin, Paris, France. Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP), INSERM 1018, Paris, France. Groupe Hospitalo-Universitaire AP-HP, Paris, France.Addiction Psychiatry, Addictions Department, National Addiction Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience King's College, 16 De Crespigny Park, Camberwell, London, SE5 8AF, UK. European Federation of Addiction Societies (EUFAS), 16 De Crespigny Park, Camberwell, London, SE5 8AF, UK.Antwerp University (UA, CAPRI), Antwerp, Belgium. Belgian Professional Psychiatry Association, Antwerp, Belgium. European Federation of Addiction Societies (EUFAS), Antwerp, Belgium. European Psychiatric Association (EPA), Prinsstraat 13, 2000, Antwerp, Belgium.SOCIDROGALCOHOL, Barcelona, Spain. CAARFE, Valencia, Spain. Departamento de Biología Aplicada, Alicante, Spain. UCA, Alcoy, Alicante, Spain.Institute for Mental Health Policy Research & Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), Toronto, Canada. Dalla Lana School of Public Health and Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto (UofT), 155 College St., Toronto, Canada. Epidemiological Research Unit, Technische Universität Dresden, Klinische Psychologie and Psychotherapie, Dresden, Germany. Department of International Health Projects, Institute for Leadership and Health Management, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russian Federation.Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS), Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany St, Boston, MA, 02118, USA. Medicine, Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, 02118, USA. Grayken Center on Addiction, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, 02118, USA.WHO Collaborating Centre on Research and Health-Osservatorio Nazionale Alcol, Promotion on Alcohol and Alcohol-related Health, Problems (ITA-79), Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy. Società Italiana di Alcologia - SIA, EUFAS Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy.Grup Recerca Addiccions Clínic (GRAC-GRE), Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clínic Barcelona, Rosselló 149, 08036, Barcelona, Spain. International Network on Brief Interventions for Alcohol and Other Drugs (INEBRIA), Barcelona, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32731868

Citation

López-Pelayo, Hugo, et al. ""The post-COVID Era": Challenges in the Treatment of Substance Use Disorder (SUD) After the Pandemic." BMC Medicine, vol. 18, no. 1, 2020, p. 241.
López-Pelayo H, Aubin HJ, Drummond C, et al. "The post-COVID era": challenges in the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) after the pandemic. BMC Med. 2020;18(1):241.
López-Pelayo, H., Aubin, H. J., Drummond, C., Dom, G., Pascual, F., Rehm, J., Saitz, R., Scafato, E., & Gual, A. (2020). "The post-COVID era": challenges in the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) after the pandemic. BMC Medicine, 18(1), 241. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-020-01693-9
López-Pelayo H, et al. "The post-COVID Era": Challenges in the Treatment of Substance Use Disorder (SUD) After the Pandemic. BMC Med. 2020 07 31;18(1):241. PubMed PMID: 32731868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - "The post-COVID era": challenges in the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) after the pandemic. AU - López-Pelayo,Hugo, AU - Aubin,Henri-Jean, AU - Drummond,Colin, AU - Dom,Geert, AU - Pascual,Francisco, AU - Rehm,Jürgen, AU - Saitz,Richard, AU - Scafato,Emanuele, AU - Gual,Antoni, Y1 - 2020/07/31/ PY - 2020/05/15/received PY - 2020/07/01/accepted PY - 2020/8/1/entrez PY - 2020/8/1/pubmed PY - 2020/8/18/medline KW - Addictions KW - COVID-19 KW - Harm-reduction KW - Stigma KW - Substance use disorder KW - Telemedicine SP - 241 EP - 241 JF - BMC medicine JO - BMC Med VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Citizens affected by substance use disorders are high-risk populations for both SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19-related mortality. Relevant vulnerabilities to COVID-19 in people who suffer substance use disorders are described in previous communications. The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique opportunity to reshape and update addiction treatment networks. MAIN BODY: Renewed treatment systems should be based on these seven pillars: (1) telemedicine and digital solutions, (2) hospitalization at home, (3) consultation-liaison psychiatric and addiction services, (4) harm-reduction facilities, (5) person-centered care, (6) promote paid work to improve quality of life in people with substance use disorders, and (7) integrated addiction care. The three "best buys" of the World Health Organization (reduce availability, increase prices, and a ban on advertising) are still valid. Additionally, new strategies must be implemented to systematically deal with (a) fake news concerning legal and illegal drugs and (b) controversial scientific information. CONCLUSION: The heroin pandemic four decades ago was the last time that addiction treatment systems were updated in many western countries. A revised and modernized addiction treatment network must include improved access to care, facilitated where appropriate by technology; more integrated care with addiction specialists supporting non-specialists; and reducing the stigma experienced by people with SUDs. SN - 1741-7015 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32731868/"The_post_COVID_era":_challenges_in_the_treatment_of_substance_use_disorder__SUD__after_the_pandemic_ L2 - https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-020-01693-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -