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Fruit and Vegetable Purchasing Patterns and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation: Findings From a Nationally Representative Survey.
J Acad Nutr Diet. 2020 10; 120(10):1633-1642.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies suggest that Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants purchase less produce than nonparticipants. Whether this is due to buying smaller amounts or to being less likely to buy any produce is unclear. Purchase patterns may also differ over the monthly distribution cycle.

OBJECTIVE

To examine differences in the likelihood and amounts of fruits and vegetables purchased between SNAP household compared with nonparticipant households and to determine differences in produce purchases among SNAP households at different time points in the monthly distribution cycle.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional.

PARTICIPANTS/SETTING

Data from 4708 households in the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (April 2012 to January 2013). Participants recorded all foods acquired over 7 days.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Fruits and vegetables acquired over a 7-day period.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED

Weighted logistic and linear regression models adjusting for household and primary respondent characteristics were used to compare odds of purchasing fruits and vegetables and amounts purchased across 3 categories: SNAP participants, SNAP-eligible nonparticipants, and ineligible nonparticipants. SNAP participants were further subdivided according to weeks since last receiving benefits.

RESULTS

In adjusted analyses, SNAP participants and nonparticipants were similarly likely to purchase fruits and vegetables. However, SNAP households within a week of receiving benefits were more likely than SNAP households later in the benefit cycle to buy fruit overall, especially frozen or canned fruit, and vegetables overall, including fresh, frozen or canned, starchy, and nonstarchy vegetables (fruit odds ratio [OR] 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 2.53; vegetable OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.04, 2.55 vs households in middle of cycle). In contrast, those in the last week of the benefit cycle were less likely to purchase fruit, especially fresh fruit, and vegetables, especially fresh and nonstarchy vegetables (fruit OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.35, 0.94; vegetable OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.42, 0.79 vs. households in middle of cycle), and when they bought vegetables, they bought significantly less.

CONCLUSION

Considering all SNAP households together at different points in their distribution cycle masks substantial declines in purchasing fruits and vegetables over the monthly cycle.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32736954

Citation

Tseng, Marilyn, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Purchasing Patterns and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation: Findings From a Nationally Representative Survey." Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 120, no. 10, 2020, pp. 1633-1642.
Tseng M, Mastrantonio C, Glanz H, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Purchasing Patterns and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation: Findings From a Nationally Representative Survey. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2020;120(10):1633-1642.
Tseng, M., Mastrantonio, C., Glanz, H., Volpe, R. J., Neill, D. B., & Nazmi, A. (2020). Fruit and Vegetable Purchasing Patterns and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation: Findings From a Nationally Representative Survey. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120(10), 1633-1642. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2020.05.016
Tseng M, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Purchasing Patterns and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation: Findings From a Nationally Representative Survey. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2020;120(10):1633-1642. PubMed PMID: 32736954.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and Vegetable Purchasing Patterns and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation: Findings From a Nationally Representative Survey. AU - Tseng,Marilyn, AU - Mastrantonio,Carissa, AU - Glanz,Hunter, AU - Volpe,Richard J,3rd AU - Neill,Dawn B, AU - Nazmi,Aydin, Y1 - 2020/07/29/ PY - 2019/11/25/received PY - 2020/05/19/revised PY - 2020/05/20/accepted PY - 2020/8/2/pubmed PY - 2021/2/26/medline PY - 2020/8/2/entrez KW - Food purchases KW - Fruits and vegetables KW - Monthly distribution cycle KW - National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey KW - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program SP - 1633 EP - 1642 JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics JO - J Acad Nutr Diet VL - 120 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants purchase less produce than nonparticipants. Whether this is due to buying smaller amounts or to being less likely to buy any produce is unclear. Purchase patterns may also differ over the monthly distribution cycle. OBJECTIVE: To examine differences in the likelihood and amounts of fruits and vegetables purchased between SNAP household compared with nonparticipant households and to determine differences in produce purchases among SNAP households at different time points in the monthly distribution cycle. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. PARTICIPANTS/SETTING: Data from 4708 households in the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (April 2012 to January 2013). Participants recorded all foods acquired over 7 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Fruits and vegetables acquired over a 7-day period. STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Weighted logistic and linear regression models adjusting for household and primary respondent characteristics were used to compare odds of purchasing fruits and vegetables and amounts purchased across 3 categories: SNAP participants, SNAP-eligible nonparticipants, and ineligible nonparticipants. SNAP participants were further subdivided according to weeks since last receiving benefits. RESULTS: In adjusted analyses, SNAP participants and nonparticipants were similarly likely to purchase fruits and vegetables. However, SNAP households within a week of receiving benefits were more likely than SNAP households later in the benefit cycle to buy fruit overall, especially frozen or canned fruit, and vegetables overall, including fresh, frozen or canned, starchy, and nonstarchy vegetables (fruit odds ratio [OR] 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 2.53; vegetable OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.04, 2.55 vs households in middle of cycle). In contrast, those in the last week of the benefit cycle were less likely to purchase fruit, especially fresh fruit, and vegetables, especially fresh and nonstarchy vegetables (fruit OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.35, 0.94; vegetable OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.42, 0.79 vs. households in middle of cycle), and when they bought vegetables, they bought significantly less. CONCLUSION: Considering all SNAP households together at different points in their distribution cycle masks substantial declines in purchasing fruits and vegetables over the monthly cycle. SN - 2212-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32736954/Fruit_and_Vegetable_Purchasing_Patterns_and_Supplemental_Nutrition_Assistance_Program_Participation:_Findings_From_a_Nationally_Representative_Survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212-2672(20)30516-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -