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Deactivation of SARS-CoV-2 with pulsed-xenon ultraviolet light: Implications for environmental COVID-19 control.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2021 02; 42(2):127-130.IC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Prolonged survival of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) on environmental surfaces and personal protective equipment may lead to these surfaces transmitting this pathogen to others. We sought to determine the effectiveness of a pulsed-xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection system in reducing the load of SARS-CoV-2 on hard surfaces and N95 respirators.

METHODS

Chamber slides and N95 respirator material were directly inoculated with SARS-CoV-2 and were exposed to different durations of PX-UV.

RESULTS

For hard surfaces, disinfection for 1, 2, and 5 minutes resulted in 3.53 log10, >4.54 log10, and >4.12 log10 reductions in viral load, respectively. For N95 respirators, disinfection for 5 minutes resulted in >4.79 log10 reduction in viral load. PX-UV significantly reduced SARS-CoV-2 on hard surfaces and N95 respirators.

CONCLUSION

With the potential to rapidly disinfectant environmental surfaces and N95 respirators, PX-UV devices are a promising technology to reduce environmental and personal protective equipment bioburden and to enhance both healthcare worker and patient safety by reducing the risk of exposure to SARS-CoV-2.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Xenex Disinfection Services, San Antonio, Texas.Department of Virology and Immunology, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas.Department of Virology and Immunology, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas.Department of Virology and Immunology, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas.Department of Medicine, Central Texas Veterans Healthcare System, Temple, Texas. Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Bryan, Texas.Jason and Jarvis Associates, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.Department of Quality, WVU Medicine: United Hospital Center, Bridgeport, West Virginia.Department of Quality, HonorHealth, Scottsdale, Arizona.School of Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.Xenex Disinfection Services, San Antonio, Texas.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32741425

Citation

Simmons, Sarah E., et al. "Deactivation of SARS-CoV-2 With Pulsed-xenon Ultraviolet Light: Implications for Environmental COVID-19 Control." Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, vol. 42, no. 2, 2021, pp. 127-130.
Simmons SE, Carrion R, Alfson KJ, et al. Deactivation of SARS-CoV-2 with pulsed-xenon ultraviolet light: Implications for environmental COVID-19 control. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2021;42(2):127-130.
Simmons, S. E., Carrion, R., Alfson, K. J., Staples, H. M., Jinadatha, C., Jarvis, W. R., Sampathkumar, P., Chemaly, R. F., Khawaja, F., Povroznik, M., Jackson, S., Kaye, K. S., Rodriguez, R. M., & Stibich, M. A. (2021). Deactivation of SARS-CoV-2 with pulsed-xenon ultraviolet light: Implications for environmental COVID-19 control. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 42(2), 127-130. https://doi.org/10.1017/ice.2020.399
Simmons SE, et al. Deactivation of SARS-CoV-2 With Pulsed-xenon Ultraviolet Light: Implications for Environmental COVID-19 Control. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2021;42(2):127-130. PubMed PMID: 32741425.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Deactivation of SARS-CoV-2 with pulsed-xenon ultraviolet light: Implications for environmental COVID-19 control. AU - Simmons,Sarah E, AU - Carrion,Ricardo, AU - Alfson,Kendra J, AU - Staples,Hilary M, AU - Jinadatha,Chetan, AU - Jarvis,William R, AU - Sampathkumar,Priya, AU - Chemaly,Roy F, AU - Khawaja,Fareed, AU - Povroznik,Mark, AU - Jackson,Stephanie, AU - Kaye,Keith S, AU - Rodriguez,Robert M, AU - Stibich,Mark A, Y1 - 2020/08/03/ PY - 2020/8/4/pubmed PY - 2021/3/2/medline PY - 2020/8/4/entrez SP - 127 EP - 130 JF - Infection control and hospital epidemiology JO - Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol VL - 42 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Prolonged survival of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) on environmental surfaces and personal protective equipment may lead to these surfaces transmitting this pathogen to others. We sought to determine the effectiveness of a pulsed-xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection system in reducing the load of SARS-CoV-2 on hard surfaces and N95 respirators. METHODS: Chamber slides and N95 respirator material were directly inoculated with SARS-CoV-2 and were exposed to different durations of PX-UV. RESULTS: For hard surfaces, disinfection for 1, 2, and 5 minutes resulted in 3.53 log10, >4.54 log10, and >4.12 log10 reductions in viral load, respectively. For N95 respirators, disinfection for 5 minutes resulted in >4.79 log10 reduction in viral load. PX-UV significantly reduced SARS-CoV-2 on hard surfaces and N95 respirators. CONCLUSION: With the potential to rapidly disinfectant environmental surfaces and N95 respirators, PX-UV devices are a promising technology to reduce environmental and personal protective equipment bioburden and to enhance both healthcare worker and patient safety by reducing the risk of exposure to SARS-CoV-2. SN - 1559-6834 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32741425/Deactivation_of_SARS_CoV_2_with_pulsed_xenon_ultraviolet_light:_Implications_for_environmental_COVID_19_control_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0899823X20003992/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -