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Phenolic composition of 91 Australian apple varieties: towards understanding their health attributes.
Food Funct. 2020 Aug 19; 11(8):7115-7125.FF

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Apples, an important contributor to total dietary phenolic intake, are associated with cardiovascular health benefits. Determining the phenolic composition of apples, their individual variation across varieties, and the phenolic compounds present in plasma after apple consumption is integral to understanding the effects of apple phenolics on cardiovascular health.

METHODS

Using liquid chromatography we quantified five important polyphenols and one phenolic acid with potential health benefits: quercetin glycosides, (-)-epicatechin, procyanidin B2, phloridzin, anthocyanins, and chlorogenic acid, in the skin and flesh of 19 apple varieties and 72 breeding selections from the Australian National Apple Breeding program. Furthermore, we measured the phenolic compounds in the plasma of 30 individuals post-consumption of an identified phenolic-rich apple, Cripp's Pink.

RESULTS

Considerable variation in concentration of phenolic compounds was found between genotypes: quercetin (mean ± SD: 16.1 ± 5.9, range: 5.8-30.1 mg per 100 g); (-)-epicatechin (mean ± SD: 8.6 ± 5.8, range: 0.2-19.8 mg per 100 g); procyanidin B2 (mean ± SD: 11.5 ± 6.6, range: 0.5-26.5 mg per 100 g); phloridzin (mean ± SD: 1.1 ± 0.6, range: 0.3-4.3 mg per 100 g); anthocyanins (mean ± SD: 1.8 ± 4.4, range: 0-40.8 mg per 100 g); and chlorogenic acid (mean ± SD: 11.3 ± 9.9, range: 0.4-56.0 mg per 100 g). All phenolic compounds except chlorogenic acid were more concentrated in the skin compared with flesh. We observed a significant increase, with wide variation, in 14 phenolic compounds in plasma post-consumption of a phenolic-rich apple.

CONCLUSION

This information makes an important contribution to understanding the potential health benefits of apples.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Dr, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. c.bondonno@ecu.edu.au and Royal Perth Hospital Research Foundation, School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Rear 50 Murray St, Perth, WA 6000, Australia.School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Dr, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. c.bondonno@ecu.edu.au and Royal Perth Hospital Research Foundation, School of Biomedical Science, University of Western Australia, Rear 50 Murray St, Perth, WA 6000, Australia.Royal Perth Hospital Research Foundation, School of Biomedical Science, University of Western Australia, Rear 50 Murray St, Perth, WA 6000, Australia.Centre for Integrative Metabolomics and Computational Biology, School of Science, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Dr, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia.Centre for Integrative Metabolomics and Computational Biology, School of Science, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Dr, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia.ChemCentre, Corner Manning Road and Townsing Drive, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia, 3 Baron-Hay Ct, South Perth, WA 6151, Australia.Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia, 3 Baron-Hay Ct, South Perth, WA 6151, Australia.Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Flinders University of South Australia, Sturt Rd, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia.Royal Perth Hospital Research Foundation, School of Biomedical Science, University of Western Australia, Rear 50 Murray St, Perth, WA 6000, Australia.Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia, 3 Baron-Hay Ct, South Perth, WA 6151, Australia and School of Molecular Sciences, and the School of Agriculture and Environment, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia and The UWA Institute of Agriculture, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Dr, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia. c.bondonno@ecu.edu.au and Royal Perth Hospital Research Foundation, School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Rear 50 Murray St, Perth, WA 6000, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32744555

Citation

Bondonno, Catherine P., et al. "Phenolic Composition of 91 Australian Apple Varieties: Towards Understanding Their Health Attributes." Food & Function, vol. 11, no. 8, 2020, pp. 7115-7125.
Bondonno CP, Bondonno NP, Shinde S, et al. Phenolic composition of 91 Australian apple varieties: towards understanding their health attributes. Food Funct. 2020;11(8):7115-7125.
Bondonno, C. P., Bondonno, N. P., Shinde, S., Shafaei, A., Boyce, M. C., Swinny, E., Jacob, S. R., Lacey, K., Woodman, R. J., Croft, K. D., Considine, M. J., & Hodgson, J. M. (2020). Phenolic composition of 91 Australian apple varieties: towards understanding their health attributes. Food & Function, 11(8), 7115-7125. https://doi.org/10.1039/d0fo01130d
Bondonno CP, et al. Phenolic Composition of 91 Australian Apple Varieties: Towards Understanding Their Health Attributes. Food Funct. 2020 Aug 19;11(8):7115-7125. PubMed PMID: 32744555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phenolic composition of 91 Australian apple varieties: towards understanding their health attributes. AU - Bondonno,Catherine P, AU - Bondonno,Nicola P, AU - Shinde,Sujata, AU - Shafaei,Armaghan, AU - Boyce,Mary C, AU - Swinny,Ewald, AU - Jacob,Steele R, AU - Lacey,Kevin, AU - Woodman,Richard J, AU - Croft,Kevin D, AU - Considine,Michael J, AU - Hodgson,Jonathan M, PY - 2020/8/4/pubmed PY - 2021/4/27/medline PY - 2020/8/4/entrez SP - 7115 EP - 7125 JF - Food & function JO - Food Funct VL - 11 IS - 8 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Apples, an important contributor to total dietary phenolic intake, are associated with cardiovascular health benefits. Determining the phenolic composition of apples, their individual variation across varieties, and the phenolic compounds present in plasma after apple consumption is integral to understanding the effects of apple phenolics on cardiovascular health. METHODS: Using liquid chromatography we quantified five important polyphenols and one phenolic acid with potential health benefits: quercetin glycosides, (-)-epicatechin, procyanidin B2, phloridzin, anthocyanins, and chlorogenic acid, in the skin and flesh of 19 apple varieties and 72 breeding selections from the Australian National Apple Breeding program. Furthermore, we measured the phenolic compounds in the plasma of 30 individuals post-consumption of an identified phenolic-rich apple, Cripp's Pink. RESULTS: Considerable variation in concentration of phenolic compounds was found between genotypes: quercetin (mean ± SD: 16.1 ± 5.9, range: 5.8-30.1 mg per 100 g); (-)-epicatechin (mean ± SD: 8.6 ± 5.8, range: 0.2-19.8 mg per 100 g); procyanidin B2 (mean ± SD: 11.5 ± 6.6, range: 0.5-26.5 mg per 100 g); phloridzin (mean ± SD: 1.1 ± 0.6, range: 0.3-4.3 mg per 100 g); anthocyanins (mean ± SD: 1.8 ± 4.4, range: 0-40.8 mg per 100 g); and chlorogenic acid (mean ± SD: 11.3 ± 9.9, range: 0.4-56.0 mg per 100 g). All phenolic compounds except chlorogenic acid were more concentrated in the skin compared with flesh. We observed a significant increase, with wide variation, in 14 phenolic compounds in plasma post-consumption of a phenolic-rich apple. CONCLUSION: This information makes an important contribution to understanding the potential health benefits of apples. SN - 2042-650X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32744555/Phenolic_composition_of_91_Australian_apple_varieties:_towards_understanding_their_health_attributes_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -