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Longitudinal changes of liver function and hepatitis B reactivation in COVID-19 patients with pre-existing chronic hepatitis B virus infection.
Hepatol Res. 2020 Aug 06 [Online ahead of print]HR

Abstract

AIM

With the current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and high endemic levels of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection worldwide, it is urgent to investigate liver function changes of COVID-19 patients with chronic HBV infection, and how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in turn affects the course of chronic HBV infection.

METHOD

We undertook a retrospective study based on 347 COVID-19 patients (21 vs. 326 with vs. without chronic HBV infection). With the propensity score matching (PSM) method, we yielded 20 and 51 matched patients for the HBV group and the non-HBV group, respectively.

RESULTS

At the end of follow-up, all of these 71 patients achieved SARS-CoV-2 clearance (P = 0.1). During the follow-up, 30% versus 31.4% in the HBV group versus non-HBV group progressed to severe COVID-19 (P = 0.97). After PSM, the longitudinal changes of median values for liver biochemistries were not significantly different between the two groups. In the HBV group versus non-HBV group, 35% (7/20) versus 37.25% (19/51) (P = 0.86) had abnormal alanine aminotransferase at least once during hospitalization, 30% (6/20) versus 31.37% (16/51) had abnormal aspartate aminotransferase (P = 0.91), 40% (8/20) versus 37.25% (19/51) had abnormal γ-glutamyltransferase (P = 0.83), and 45% (9/20) versus 39.22% (20/51) had abnormal total bilirubin levels (P = 0.91). Moreover, three patients in the HBV group had hepatitis B reactivation.

CONCLUSIONS

Liver dysfunction presented in COVID-19 patients with/without chronic HBV. Moreover, those COVID-19 patients co-infected with chronic HBV could have a risk of hepatitis B reactivation. It is necessary to monitor liver function of COVID-19 patients, as well as HBV-DNA levels for those co-infected with HBV during the whole disease course.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, The Third People's Hospital of Shenzhen, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China.Nuffield Department of Medicine, Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, The Third People's Hospital of Shenzhen, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China.No affiliation info availableNational Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, The Third People's Hospital of Shenzhen, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China.National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, The Third People's Hospital of Shenzhen, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China.National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, The Third People's Hospital of Shenzhen, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China.Treatment and Research Center for Infectious Diseases, The Fifth Medical Center of PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China.National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, The Third People's Hospital of Shenzhen, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China.National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, The Third People's Hospital of Shenzhen, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32761993

Citation

Liu, Jiaye, et al. "Longitudinal Changes of Liver Function and Hepatitis B Reactivation in COVID-19 Patients With Pre-existing Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection." Hepatology Research : the Official Journal of the Japan Society of Hepatology, 2020.
Liu J, Wang T, Cai Q, et al. Longitudinal changes of liver function and hepatitis B reactivation in COVID-19 patients with pre-existing chronic hepatitis B virus infection. Hepatol Res. 2020.
Liu, J., Wang, T., Cai, Q., Sun, L., Huang, D., Zhou, G., He, Q., Wang, F. S., Liu, L., & Chen, J. (2020). Longitudinal changes of liver function and hepatitis B reactivation in COVID-19 patients with pre-existing chronic hepatitis B virus infection. Hepatology Research : the Official Journal of the Japan Society of Hepatology. https://doi.org/10.1111/hepr.13553
Liu J, et al. Longitudinal Changes of Liver Function and Hepatitis B Reactivation in COVID-19 Patients With Pre-existing Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection. Hepatol Res. 2020 Aug 6; PubMed PMID: 32761993.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal changes of liver function and hepatitis B reactivation in COVID-19 patients with pre-existing chronic hepatitis B virus infection. AU - Liu,Jiaye, AU - Wang,Tingyan, AU - Cai,Qingxian, AU - Sun,Liqin, AU - Huang,Deliang, AU - Zhou,Guangde, AU - He,Qing, AU - Wang,Fu-Sheng, AU - Liu,Lei, AU - Chen,Jun, Y1 - 2020/08/06/ PY - 2020/06/29/received PY - 2020/07/23/revised PY - 2020/07/28/accepted PY - 2020/8/8/pubmed PY - 2020/8/8/medline PY - 2020/8/8/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - HBV KW - hepatitis B reactivation KW - liver function JF - Hepatology research : the official journal of the Japan Society of Hepatology JO - Hepatol. Res. N2 - AIM: With the current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and high endemic levels of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection worldwide, it is urgent to investigate liver function changes of COVID-19 patients with chronic HBV infection, and how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in turn affects the course of chronic HBV infection. METHOD: We undertook a retrospective study based on 347 COVID-19 patients (21 vs. 326 with vs. without chronic HBV infection). With the propensity score matching (PSM) method, we yielded 20 and 51 matched patients for the HBV group and the non-HBV group, respectively. RESULTS: At the end of follow-up, all of these 71 patients achieved SARS-CoV-2 clearance (P = 0.1). During the follow-up, 30% versus 31.4% in the HBV group versus non-HBV group progressed to severe COVID-19 (P = 0.97). After PSM, the longitudinal changes of median values for liver biochemistries were not significantly different between the two groups. In the HBV group versus non-HBV group, 35% (7/20) versus 37.25% (19/51) (P = 0.86) had abnormal alanine aminotransferase at least once during hospitalization, 30% (6/20) versus 31.37% (16/51) had abnormal aspartate aminotransferase (P = 0.91), 40% (8/20) versus 37.25% (19/51) had abnormal γ-glutamyltransferase (P = 0.83), and 45% (9/20) versus 39.22% (20/51) had abnormal total bilirubin levels (P = 0.91). Moreover, three patients in the HBV group had hepatitis B reactivation. CONCLUSIONS: Liver dysfunction presented in COVID-19 patients with/without chronic HBV. Moreover, those COVID-19 patients co-infected with chronic HBV could have a risk of hepatitis B reactivation. It is necessary to monitor liver function of COVID-19 patients, as well as HBV-DNA levels for those co-infected with HBV during the whole disease course. SN - 1386-6346 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32761993/Longitudinal_Changes_of_Liver_Function_and_Hepatitis_B_Reactivation_in_COVID-19_Patients_with_Pre-existing_Chronic_HBV_Infection L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/hepr.13553 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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