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Psychological resilience and positive coping styles among Chinese undergraduate students: a cross-sectional study.
BMC Psychol. 2020 Aug 06; 8(1):79.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Psychological resilience and coping strategies have been found to be related to various psychological and mental health problems. Evaluations of the relationship between resilience and coping style among university students are important for developing effective health promotion strategies focused on resilience intervention to benefit students' health and well-being. The relationship between psychological resilience and coping styles has usually been examined among adults and patients. Very few studies have investigated the relationship between resilience and coping style in university students. The present study aimed to investigate the associations between psychological resilience, students' characteristics (gender, major and grade) and coping styles among undergraduate students.

METHODS

A cross-sectional survey was conducted among undergraduate students in Shandong Province, China. Undergraduate students were randomly selected from 6 universities in 3 cities of the province using a stratified random sampling method. The questionnaire included questions on the participants' demographic information, including gender, grade and major, measures of psychological resilience and coping style. Coping style was measured by the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). The Asian Resilience Scale (ARS) was applied to evaluate undergraduates' psychological resilience. Multivariable regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between resilience, students' characteristics and positive coping styles.

RESULTS

A sample of 1743 undergraduates was analysed. The mean psychological resilience score was 70.41. The mean score for positive coping style was 24.72. Multiple regression analysis showed that three factors of psychological resilience, mood control, self-plasticity and coping flexibility, were all significant factors for positive coping styles (regression coefficient = 0.34, 0.35, 0.14, p < 0.01 for the three factors, respectively). Medical students and females had higher scores for positive coping styles than non-medical students and males (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

The research revealed that females and medical students are more likely than males and non-medical students to adopt positive coping styles. Higher psychological resilience is associated with a better positive coping style. The findings suggest that psychological education and health promotion programmes that target strengthening psychological resilience among undergraduate students may help foster positive coping styles to benefit their mental health and psychological well-being.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Weifang Medical University, 7166 Baotong West Street, Weifang, 261053, Shandong Province, China.Heart Center, Sunshine Union Hospital, 9000 Yingqian Street, Weifang, 261061, Shandong Province, China.Weifang Medical University, 7166 Baotong West Street, Weifang, 261053, Shandong Province, China.Weifang Medical University, 7166 Baotong West Street, Weifang, 261053, Shandong Province, China.Weifang Medical University, 7166 Baotong West Street, Weifang, 261053, Shandong Province, China. wykunming@126.com.Weifang Medical University, 7166 Baotong West Street, Weifang, 261053, Shandong Province, China. ghluu@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32762769

Citation

Wu, Yu, et al. "Psychological Resilience and Positive Coping Styles Among Chinese Undergraduate Students: a Cross-sectional Study." BMC Psychology, vol. 8, no. 1, 2020, p. 79.
Wu Y, Yu W, Wu X, et al. Psychological resilience and positive coping styles among Chinese undergraduate students: a cross-sectional study. BMC Psychol. 2020;8(1):79.
Wu, Y., Yu, W., Wu, X., Wan, H., Wang, Y., & Lu, G. (2020). Psychological resilience and positive coping styles among Chinese undergraduate students: a cross-sectional study. BMC Psychology, 8(1), 79. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40359-020-00444-y
Wu Y, et al. Psychological Resilience and Positive Coping Styles Among Chinese Undergraduate Students: a Cross-sectional Study. BMC Psychol. 2020 Aug 6;8(1):79. PubMed PMID: 32762769.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychological resilience and positive coping styles among Chinese undergraduate students: a cross-sectional study. AU - Wu,Yu, AU - Yu,Wenzhou, AU - Wu,Xiuyun, AU - Wan,Huihui, AU - Wang,Ying, AU - Lu,Guohua, Y1 - 2020/08/06/ PY - 2020/04/16/received PY - 2020/07/20/accepted PY - 2020/8/9/entrez PY - 2020/8/9/pubmed PY - 2021/1/7/medline KW - Coping styles KW - Psychological education KW - Resilience KW - Undergraduates SP - 79 EP - 79 JF - BMC psychology JO - BMC Psychol VL - 8 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Psychological resilience and coping strategies have been found to be related to various psychological and mental health problems. Evaluations of the relationship between resilience and coping style among university students are important for developing effective health promotion strategies focused on resilience intervention to benefit students' health and well-being. The relationship between psychological resilience and coping styles has usually been examined among adults and patients. Very few studies have investigated the relationship between resilience and coping style in university students. The present study aimed to investigate the associations between psychological resilience, students' characteristics (gender, major and grade) and coping styles among undergraduate students. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among undergraduate students in Shandong Province, China. Undergraduate students were randomly selected from 6 universities in 3 cities of the province using a stratified random sampling method. The questionnaire included questions on the participants' demographic information, including gender, grade and major, measures of psychological resilience and coping style. Coping style was measured by the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). The Asian Resilience Scale (ARS) was applied to evaluate undergraduates' psychological resilience. Multivariable regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between resilience, students' characteristics and positive coping styles. RESULTS: A sample of 1743 undergraduates was analysed. The mean psychological resilience score was 70.41. The mean score for positive coping style was 24.72. Multiple regression analysis showed that three factors of psychological resilience, mood control, self-plasticity and coping flexibility, were all significant factors for positive coping styles (regression coefficient = 0.34, 0.35, 0.14, p < 0.01 for the three factors, respectively). Medical students and females had higher scores for positive coping styles than non-medical students and males (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The research revealed that females and medical students are more likely than males and non-medical students to adopt positive coping styles. Higher psychological resilience is associated with a better positive coping style. The findings suggest that psychological education and health promotion programmes that target strengthening psychological resilience among undergraduate students may help foster positive coping styles to benefit their mental health and psychological well-being. SN - 2050-7283 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32762769/Psychological_resilience_and_positive_coping_styles_among_Chinese_undergraduate_students:_a_cross_sectional_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -