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Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on inflammatory markers: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
Cytokine. 2020 11; 135:155224.C

Abstract

The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the efficacy of ginger supplementation on circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The search included PubMed-Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases to identify randomized clinical trials on the effect of ginger supplementation on circulation levels of CRP, hs-CRP, IL-6, sICAM, and TNF-α published up until February 1st, 2020. We did not restrict articles based on language of publication. Standard mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for net changes in inflammatory mediators using a random-effects model. Sixteen RCTs comprising 1010 participants were found to be eligible for this meta-analysis. There was a significant reduction of circulating CRP (SMD: -5.11, 95% CI: -7.91, -2.30, I2 = 98.1%), hs-CRP (SMD: -0.88, 95% CI: -1.63, -0.12, I2 = 90.8%) and TNF-α levels (SMD: -0.85, 95% CI: -1.48, -0.21, I2 = 89.4%) following ginger supplementation. However, meta-analysis results did not show any significant impact of ginger supplementation on IL-6 (SMD: -0.45, 95% CI: -1.29, 0.38, I2 = 89.2%), and sICAM levels (SMD: -0.05, 95% CI: -0.36, 0.26, I2 = 00.0%). This systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs demonstrates a significant impact of ginger in lowering circulating CRP, hs-CRP and TNF-α levels. Large-scale RCTs are still needed to draw concrete conclusions about the effect of ginger on other inflammatory mediators.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran.Clinical Research Development Unit, Ayatollah Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran. Electronic address: siavashfazelian@yahoo.com.Colorectal Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Nutrition Department, Faculty of Paramedicine, Ahvaz Jundishapour University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Baylor Scott & White Research Institute, Dallas, TX, USA. Electronic address: Eric.potter@bswhealth.org.Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology, Research Institute Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address: javad.heshmati@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32763761

Citation

Morvaridzadeh, Mojgan, et al. "Effect of Ginger (Zingiber Officinale) On Inflammatory Markers: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials." Cytokine, vol. 135, 2020, p. 155224.
Morvaridzadeh M, Fazelian S, Agah S, et al. Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on inflammatory markers: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Cytokine. 2020;135:155224.
Morvaridzadeh, M., Fazelian, S., Agah, S., Khazdouz, M., Rahimlou, M., Agh, F., Potter, E., Heshmati, S., & Heshmati, J. (2020). Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on inflammatory markers: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Cytokine, 135, 155224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2020.155224
Morvaridzadeh M, et al. Effect of Ginger (Zingiber Officinale) On Inflammatory Markers: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Cytokine. 2020;135:155224. PubMed PMID: 32763761.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on inflammatory markers: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. AU - Morvaridzadeh,Mojgan, AU - Fazelian,Siavash, AU - Agah,Shahram, AU - Khazdouz,Maryam, AU - Rahimlou,Mehran, AU - Agh,Fahimeh, AU - Potter,Eric, AU - Heshmati,Shilan, AU - Heshmati,Javad, Y1 - 2020/08/05/ PY - 2020/04/21/received PY - 2020/06/10/revised PY - 2020/07/25/accepted PY - 2020/8/9/pubmed PY - 2021/12/15/medline PY - 2020/8/9/entrez KW - C - reactive protein KW - Ginger KW - IL-6 KW - Inflammation KW - TNF-α SP - 155224 EP - 155224 JF - Cytokine JO - Cytokine VL - 135 N2 - The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the efficacy of ginger supplementation on circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The search included PubMed-Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases to identify randomized clinical trials on the effect of ginger supplementation on circulation levels of CRP, hs-CRP, IL-6, sICAM, and TNF-α published up until February 1st, 2020. We did not restrict articles based on language of publication. Standard mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for net changes in inflammatory mediators using a random-effects model. Sixteen RCTs comprising 1010 participants were found to be eligible for this meta-analysis. There was a significant reduction of circulating CRP (SMD: -5.11, 95% CI: -7.91, -2.30, I2 = 98.1%), hs-CRP (SMD: -0.88, 95% CI: -1.63, -0.12, I2 = 90.8%) and TNF-α levels (SMD: -0.85, 95% CI: -1.48, -0.21, I2 = 89.4%) following ginger supplementation. However, meta-analysis results did not show any significant impact of ginger supplementation on IL-6 (SMD: -0.45, 95% CI: -1.29, 0.38, I2 = 89.2%), and sICAM levels (SMD: -0.05, 95% CI: -0.36, 0.26, I2 = 00.0%). This systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs demonstrates a significant impact of ginger in lowering circulating CRP, hs-CRP and TNF-α levels. Large-scale RCTs are still needed to draw concrete conclusions about the effect of ginger on other inflammatory mediators. SN - 1096-0023 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32763761/Effect_of_ginger__Zingiber_officinale__on_inflammatory_markers:_A_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_randomized_controlled_trials_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -