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Willingness to Vaccinate Children against Influenza after the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic.
J Pediatr. 2021 Jan; 228:87-93.e2.JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine factors associated with parents who plan to vaccinate their children against influenza next year, especially those who did not vaccinate against influenza last year using a global survey.

STUDY DESIGN

A survey of caregivers accompanying their children aged 1-19 years old in 17 pediatric emergency departments in 6 countries at the peak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Anonymous online survey included caregiver and child demographic information, vaccination history and future intentions, and concern about the child and caregiver having COVID-19 at the time of emergency department visit.

RESULTS

Of 2422 surveys, 1314 (54.2%) caregivers stated they plan to vaccinate their child against influenza next year, an increase of 15.8% from the previous year. Of 1459 caregivers who did not vaccinate their children last year, 418 (28.6%) plan to do so next year. Factors predicting willingness to change and vaccinate included child's up-to-date vaccination status (aOR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29-3.32, P = .003); caregivers' influenza vaccine history (aOR 3.26, 95% CI 2.41-4.40, P < .010), and level of concern their child had COVID-19 (aOR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.17, P = .022).

CONCLUSIONS

Changes in risk perception due to COVID-19, and previous vaccination, may serve to influence decision-making among caregivers regarding influenza vaccination in the coming season. To promote influenza vaccination among children, public health programs can leverage this information.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Pediatric Research in Emergency Therapeutics (PRETx) Program, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, and BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.The Pediatric Research in Emergency Therapeutics (PRETx) Program, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, and BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Children's Medical Center of Dallas, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.Division of Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.Division of Emergency and Transport Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, USC Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA.Emergency Department, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Seattle Children's Hospital and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA.Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona, Pediatric Emergency Department, Barcelona, Spain.Pediatric Emergency Medicine Unit, Shamir Medical Center, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Inselspital University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Pediatric Emergency Department, Pediatric Institute of Italian part of Switzerland, Ticino, Switzerland.Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Jim Pattison Children's Hospital, and University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Geneva Children's Hospital, Geneva University Hospitals, and Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Alberta Children's Hospital and University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Department of Emergency Medicine, Mary Bridge Children's Hospital, Tacoma, WA.Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, Women and Children's Health Research Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.Seattle Children's Hospital and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32771480

Citation

Goldman, Ran D., et al. "Willingness to Vaccinate Children Against Influenza After the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 228, 2021, pp. 87-93.e2.
Goldman RD, McGregor S, Marneni SR, et al. Willingness to Vaccinate Children against Influenza after the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic. J Pediatr. 2021;228:87-93.e2.
Goldman, R. D., McGregor, S., Marneni, S. R., Katsuta, T., Griffiths, M. A., Hall, J. E., Seiler, M., Klein, E. J., Cotanda, C. P., Gelernter, R., Hoeffe, J., Davis, A. L., Gualco, G., Mater, A., Manzano, S., Thompson, G. C., Ahmed, S., Ali, S., & Brown, J. C. (2021). Willingness to Vaccinate Children against Influenza after the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic. The Journal of Pediatrics, 228, 87-e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.08.005
Goldman RD, et al. Willingness to Vaccinate Children Against Influenza After the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic. J Pediatr. 2021;228:87-93.e2. PubMed PMID: 32771480.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Willingness to Vaccinate Children against Influenza after the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic. AU - Goldman,Ran D, AU - McGregor,Sophie, AU - Marneni,Shashidhar R, AU - Katsuta,Tomohiro, AU - Griffiths,Mark A, AU - Hall,Jeanine E, AU - Seiler,Michelle, AU - Klein,Eileen J, AU - Cotanda,Cristina Parra, AU - Gelernter,Renana, AU - Hoeffe,Julia, AU - Davis,Adrienne L, AU - Gualco,Gianluca, AU - Mater,Ahmed, AU - Manzano,Sergio, AU - Thompson,Graham C, AU - Ahmed,Sara, AU - Ali,Samina, AU - Brown,Julie C, AU - ,, Y1 - 2020/08/07/ PY - 2020/07/22/received PY - 2020/07/24/revised PY - 2020/08/04/accepted PY - 2020/8/11/pubmed PY - 2021/1/5/medline PY - 2020/8/11/entrez KW - parental attitudes KW - vaccine hesitancy SP - 87 EP - 93.e2 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J Pediatr VL - 228 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine factors associated with parents who plan to vaccinate their children against influenza next year, especially those who did not vaccinate against influenza last year using a global survey. STUDY DESIGN: A survey of caregivers accompanying their children aged 1-19 years old in 17 pediatric emergency departments in 6 countries at the peak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Anonymous online survey included caregiver and child demographic information, vaccination history and future intentions, and concern about the child and caregiver having COVID-19 at the time of emergency department visit. RESULTS: Of 2422 surveys, 1314 (54.2%) caregivers stated they plan to vaccinate their child against influenza next year, an increase of 15.8% from the previous year. Of 1459 caregivers who did not vaccinate their children last year, 418 (28.6%) plan to do so next year. Factors predicting willingness to change and vaccinate included child's up-to-date vaccination status (aOR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29-3.32, P = .003); caregivers' influenza vaccine history (aOR 3.26, 95% CI 2.41-4.40, P < .010), and level of concern their child had COVID-19 (aOR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.17, P = .022). CONCLUSIONS: Changes in risk perception due to COVID-19, and previous vaccination, may serve to influence decision-making among caregivers regarding influenza vaccination in the coming season. To promote influenza vaccination among children, public health programs can leverage this information. SN - 1097-6833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32771480/Willingness_to_Vaccinate_Children_against_Influenza_after_the_Coronavirus_Disease_2019_Pandemic_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(20)30987-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -